Date   

Re: Indoor trainers

Smblock Ameritech Mail <smblock@...>
 

On Dec 12, 2017, at 12:21 PM, Sean Malia stmalia@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Anyone have one of these they’re really happy with? Thinking of getting one & have no idea what’s good, etc.

Thx

Sean Malia


Please excuse typos


Re: Indoor trainers

steveojano
 

Computrainer of your are on a budget but still want something that works with all online "games" (ie zwift, trainer road, etc) and want bombproof construction that will last 15+ years of abuse.

On Dec 12, 2017 3:22 PM, "Sean Malia stmalia@... [BBC-Bike]" <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:
 

Anyone have one of these they’re really happy with? Thinking of getting one & have no idea what’s good, etc.

Thx

Sean Malia


Please excuse typos


Re: Indoor trainers

Jon Ogden
 

I would highly recommend the Wahoo Kicker. It’s what I have and is terrific. It’s controllable and will work with cycling apps like Zwift (which is highly addictive). 

The Kickr is nice because you go direct to the flywheel and you aren’t wearing out your tires while training. Wahoo also has their Snap trainer which is controllable but requires user of your rear wheel. 

Jon 


On Dec 12, 2017, at 2:21 PM, Sean Malia stmalia@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Anyone have one of these they’re really happy with? Thinking of getting one & have no idea what’s good, etc.

Thx

Sean Malia


Please excuse typos


Indoor trainers

Sean Malia
 

Anyone have one of these they’re really happy with? Thinking of getting one & have no idea what’s good, etc.

Thx

Sean Malia
Please excuse typos


"Super Moon" Ride

Darryl Racki
 

Greg,

Thanks for organizing, that was really cool, 19 headlights and taillights snaking through the preserves. I know Sherri gave you the bump, so in addition thanks to anyone else organizing behind the scenes, there usually are a few working in the shadows!


Darryl Racki



Priority registration is open now for 2018!

Carol Curtis
 




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Date: December 8, 2017 at 5:03:01 AM CST
To: spinaholic@...
Subject: Priority registration is open now for 2018!
Reply-To: transformotion@...

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Re: Today’s Wall Street Journal…enjoy

Carol Curtis
 

Amen


On Dec 7, 2017, at 9:19 PM, Matt Blue mattheweblue@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for sharing Greg. I threw away all of my gadgets, including my speedometer, more than five years ago and I have never looked back. It totally liberated me and it let me enjoy ALL of my rides once again. I now listen to my body and ride slow when I want to (and I don't care).

I think it's worth giving it a try (for more than a week). You might even find that you get faster (although you'll never know!). :)

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 10:06 AM, Greg Bach bachbenefitgroup@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:
 

 

Why Gadget-Obsessed Jocks Need a Data Detox
Cycling gadgets can calculate heart rate, speed and energy output in real time. But are they obscuring the sport’s appeal? To find out, one amateur sheds his high-tech gear

Illustration: Kerry Hyndman
By
Lee Marshall
Dec. 6, 2017 12:37 p.m. ET
ON THE JULY evening when I arrived in the Dolomites, Italy’s most handsome mountain range was shaking off the clouds that had brought summer showers to the Alta Badia valley. Above the tree line, a jagged wall of ice-scoured rock glowed creamy pink in the setting sun. But I had no appetite for such sublime views. Disaster had just struck.
I was here to take part, for the first time, in one of the great European one-day amateur cycling challenges: the Maratona dles Dolomites, a punishing 83-mile course over seven Alpine passes. Rifling through my kit, however, I’d realized that I had foolishly left my heart-rate monitor at home.
Like most of those for whom cycling is an obsession rather than a means of transport, I embrace technology. Not just the technology that allows me to go faster—carbon frames, aero handlebars, ultralightweight wheels—but the technology that tells me (among other things) just how briskly I’m moving. How quickly or slowly my pedals are turning. How many calories I’m painstakingly burning. And how all this exercise is making my heart work. I can measure the latter in terms of either beats per minute or as an average of my maximum heart rate during workouts using my Garmin cycling computer and GPS. I’ve come to depend on knowing exactly which “zone” I’m in.
The missing monitor—a chest-strapped device that communicates with the handlebar-mounted Garmin via Bluetooth—would have picked up that heart rate reading. My dejection on discovering my oversight had nothing to do with health issues. I knew from experience that even when I’m racing, my heartbeat stays well within a range most cardiologists consider safe for a 55-year-old. But how would I know, during the race, how much effort I was putting in, mile by mile, without my computer? And when I uploaded my ride to Strava—the widely used social network that allows athletes to track and measure their performances against friends and followers—where would that neat heart rate graph be, the one that often looks like an enraged porcupine?
Yes, those questions now sound pretty dumb to me too. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers on the screen.

CHANGING GEARS
Early the next day, I set off from the village of La Villa with 9,128 other cyclists. Over the next seven hours, I settled into a pace just below the point at which the pain outweighed the gain (technically, this is known as the “lactate threshold”), allowing myself some brief recovery periods, ramping up the effort when my legs felt good. I enjoyed the scenery, chatted with other cyclists, even stopped to take selfies. For the first time in a while, I actually enjoyed a race. I didn’t come anywhere near the podium, not even for my age group. Then again, I never do.
Data-obsessed athletes are fond of telling themselves, and anyone who will listen, that perceived effort can be inaccurate—that’s why they need hard data. But I know for a fact that I wouldn’t have ridden any faster with the heart monitor. It would instead have just added to my data stress. And yet until my Dolomitic revelation, I’d been seriously considering adding another pointlessly complex data field to my ride by investing in a power meter, which calculates in watts the strain exerted on the pedals or crank arm—and which can cost between $300 and $1,500.
Instead, I scaled back, eventually shedding all technology save for an iPhone to track my rides. I was, and I still am, tempted to record and gawk at data, but I realized watching the numbers rise and fall had become an obsession.
But Piet Morgan, CEO of athletic technology company Hammerhead, does not believe cycling has reached “peak data” just yet. “Cycling is at the cutting edge of athletic-data collection,” he said, because it involves two complex machines, the human body and bicycle, each of which can generate multiple readings. Rather than rejecting data out of hand, Mr. Morgan feels cyclists need to be given tools to use measurements and graphs of heart rate, power output, and cadence—the rate at which you turn the pedals—more effectively. His company’s first product was the gratifyingly simple LED-based H1 bike navigation tool. The second, which started shipping in November, is named Karoo. It’s a much more sophisticated device designed, Mr. Morgan said, to be a combination cycling computer and personal trainer. It not only flashes up cryptic figures but also adapts to each rider automatically and generates unique training plans based on factors like fatigue, diet, and stress.
This is perfectly fine if going faster is your aim. The problem is that so many cyclists become slave to the numbers even on gentle recovery rides or social outings. Club rides, the core of the amateur cyclist’s week, are often spoiled when fellow team members race ahead of the group to chase a Strava personal best. (I’ve been guilty of this myself.)
When riding a few years ago in Corsica with Simon Mottram, founder and CEO of the cultish British cycling apparel and lifestyle brand Rapha, I noticed he hadn’t strapped a GPS unit to his handlebars. Neither, it turned out, was he tracking the ride on his smartphone. When I asked him about this recently, Mr. Mottram told me that as a young cyclist in the 1980s he was an early adopter of some of the first effective cycling “cockpit instrumentation,” including the innovative Avocet speedometer. But he gave up data pretty early on, he said. “I didn’t think it was helping in any way.”
‘I realized I was behaving like an idiot. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers.’
Pressed, Mr. Mottram bluntly explained, “I find the whole idea of measuring and monitoring—even looking back at, say, the profile of your climb or what speed you did—really uninteresting. Cycling is the most incredible, beautiful, challenging sport for so many reasons. One of those is that it’s such a rich counterpoint to sitting in a conference room or an office or a tube train. And, I think, looking at screens and stuff, who cares? You want to be in the moment.”
Three months after the Maratona, I tackled another legendary Italian cycling challenge, L’Eroica: 130 miles, over 10,000 feet of climbing, with most of the route on unpaved Tuscan strade bianche or white roads, some with gradients of up to 15%. Oh, and you had to ride it on a pre-1987 vintage steel racing bike—the kind with the gear shifters on the down tube. I left my heart-rate monitor at home, on purpose this time. None of us had Garmins mounted to handlebars. They would have ruined the aesthetic, and in any case this was not a race: You won by simply making it to the end. All the data we needed was on the regular L’Eroica course markers that, with agonizing slowness, counted down the distance left to Gaiole in Chianti, our departure point and eventual destination.
Yes, I documented the exhausting but magnificent 13-hour ride on Strava using an iPhone tucked into the back pocket of my cycling jersey. I still like to tally how many kilometers I pedal each year, how many Everests I climb. But all the data—the heart rate zones, power curve? I’ll come back to those if I ever get myself a trainer. In the meantime, I’m going to leave watts to the lightbulbs.



Re: Today’s Wall Street Journal…enjoy

Tom Cramer
 

Matt, the only time you “ride slow” is when your waiting up for us!..lol

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From: BBC-Bike@... on behalf of Matt Blue mattheweblue@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:19:36 PM
To: Greg Bach
Cc: BBC-Bike
Subject: Re: [BBC-Bike] Today’s Wall Street Journal…enjoy
 
 

Thanks for sharing Greg. I threw away all of my gadgets, including my speedometer, more than five years ago and I have never looked back. It totally liberated me and it let me enjoy ALL of my rides once again. I now listen to my body and ride slow when I want to (and I don't care).

I think it's worth giving it a try (for more than a week). You might even find that you get faster (although you'll never know!). :)

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 10:06 AM, Greg Bach bachbenefitgroup@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:
 

 

Why Gadget-Obsessed Jocks Need a Data Detox
Cycling gadgets can calculate heart rate, speed and energy output in real time. But are they obscuring the sport’s appeal? To find out, one amateur sheds his high-tech gear

Illustration: Kerry Hyndman
By
Lee Marshall
Dec. 6, 2017 12:37 p.m. ET
ON THE JULY evening when I arrived in the Dolomites, Italy’s most handsome mountain range was shaking off the clouds that had brought summer showers to the Alta Badia valley. Above the tree line, a jagged wall of ice-scoured rock glowed creamy pink in the setting sun. But I had no appetite for such sublime views. Disaster had just struck.
I was here to take part, for the first time, in one of the great European one-day amateur cycling challenges: the Maratona dles Dolomites, a punishing 83-mile course over seven Alpine passes. Rifling through my kit, however, I’d realized that I had foolishly left my heart-rate monitor at home.
Like most of those for whom cycling is an obsession rather than a means of transport, I embrace technology. Not just the technology that allows me to go faster—carbon frames, aero handlebars, ultralightweight wheels—but the technology that tells me (among other things) just how briskly I’m moving. How quickly or slowly my pedals are turning. How many calories I’m painstakingly burning. And how all this exercise is making my heart work. I can measure the latter in terms of either beats per minute or as an average of my maximum heart rate during workouts using my Garmin cycling computer and GPS. I’ve come to depend on knowing exactly which “zone” I’m in.
The missing monitor—a chest-strapped device that communicates with the handlebar-mounted Garmin via Bluetooth—would have picked up that heart rate reading. My dejection on discovering my oversight had nothing to do with health issues. I knew from experience that even when I’m racing, my heartbeat stays well within a range most cardiologists consider safe for a 55-year-old. But how would I know, during the race, how much effort I was putting in, mile by mile, without my computer? And when I uploaded my ride to Strava—the widely used social network that allows athletes to track and measure their performances against friends and followers—where would that neat heart rate graph be, the one that often looks like an enraged porcupine?
Yes, those questions now sound pretty dumb to me too. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers on the screen.

CHANGING GEARS
Early the next day, I set off from the village of La Villa with 9,128 other cyclists. Over the next seven hours, I settled into a pace just below the point at which the pain outweighed the gain (technically, this is known as the “lactate threshold”), allowing myself some brief recovery periods, ramping up the effort when my legs felt good. I enjoyed the scenery, chatted with other cyclists, even stopped to take selfies. For the first time in a while, I actually enjoyed a race. I didn’t come anywhere near the podium, not even for my age group. Then again, I never do.
Data-obsessed athletes are fond of telling themselves, and anyone who will listen, that perceived effort can be inaccurate—that’s why they need hard data. But I know for a fact that I wouldn’t have ridden any faster with the heart monitor. It would instead have just added to my data stress. And yet until my Dolomitic revelation, I’d been seriously considering adding another pointlessly complex data field to my ride by investing in a power meter, which calculates in watts the strain exerted on the pedals or crank arm—and which can cost between $300 and $1,500.
Instead, I scaled back, eventually shedding all technology save for an iPhone to track my rides. I was, and I still am, tempted to record and gawk at data, but I realized watching the numbers rise and fall had become an obsession.
But Piet Morgan, CEO of athletic technology company Hammerhead, does not believe cycling has reached “peak data” just yet. “Cycling is at the cutting edge of athletic-data collection,” he said, because it involves two complex machines, the human body and bicycle, each of which can generate multiple readings. Rather than rejecting data out of hand, Mr. Morgan feels cyclists need to be given tools to use measurements and graphs of heart rate, power output, and cadence—the rate at which you turn the pedals—more effectively. His company’s first product was the gratifyingly simple LED-based H1 bike navigation tool. The second, which started shipping in November, is named Karoo. It’s a much more sophisticated device designed, Mr. Morgan said, to be a combination cycling computer and personal trainer. It not only flashes up cryptic figures but also adapts to each rider automatically and generates unique training plans based on factors like fatigue, diet, and stress.
This is perfectly fine if going faster is your aim. The problem is that so many cyclists become slave to the numbers even on gentle recovery rides or social outings. Club rides, the core of the amateur cyclist’s week, are often spoiled when fellow team members race ahead of the group to chase a Strava personal best. (I’ve been guilty of this myself.)
When riding a few years ago in Corsica with Simon Mottram, founder and CEO of the cultish British cycling apparel and lifestyle brand Rapha, I noticed he hadn’t strapped a GPS unit to his handlebars. Neither, it turned out, was he tracking the ride on his smartphone. When I asked him about this recently, Mr. Mottram told me that as a young cyclist in the 1980s he was an early adopter of some of the first effective cycling “cockpit instrumentation,” including the innovative Avocet speedometer. But he gave up data pretty early on, he said. “I didn’t think it was helping in any way.”
‘I realized I was behaving like an idiot. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers.’
Pressed, Mr. Mottram bluntly explained, “I find the whole idea of measuring and monitoring—even looking back at, say, the profile of your climb or what speed you did—really uninteresting. Cycling is the most incredible, beautiful, challenging sport for so many reasons. One of those is that it’s such a rich counterpoint to sitting in a conference room or an office or a tube train. And, I think, looking at screens and stuff, who cares? You want to be in the moment.”
Three months after the Maratona, I tackled another legendary Italian cycling challenge, L’Eroica: 130 miles, over 10,000 feet of climbing, with most of the route on unpaved Tuscan strade bianche or white roads, some with gradients of up to 15%. Oh, and you had to ride it on a pre-1987 vintage steel racing bike—the kind with the gear shifters on the down tube. I left my heart-rate monitor at home, on purpose this time. None of us had Garmins mounted to handlebars. They would have ruined the aesthetic, and in any case this was not a race: You won by simply making it to the end. All the data we needed was on the regular L’Eroica course markers that, with agonizing slowness, counted down the distance left to Gaiole in Chianti, our departure point and eventual destination.
Yes, I documented the exhausting but magnificent 13-hour ride on Strava using an iPhone tucked into the back pocket of my cycling jersey. I still like to tally how many kilometers I pedal each year, how many Everests I climb. But all the data—the heart rate zones, power curve? I’ll come back to those if I ever get myself a trainer. In the meantime, I’m going to leave watts to the lightbulbs.


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Re: Today’s Wall Street Journal…enjoy

Matt Blue
 

Thanks for sharing Greg. I threw away all of my gadgets, including my speedometer, more than five years ago and I have never looked back. It totally liberated me and it let me enjoy ALL of my rides once again. I now listen to my body and ride slow when I want to (and I don't care).

I think it's worth giving it a try (for more than a week). You might even find that you get faster (although you'll never know!). :)

On Thu, Dec 7, 2017 at 10:06 AM, Greg Bach bachbenefitgroup@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:
 

 

Why Gadget-Obsessed Jocks Need a Data Detox
Cycling gadgets can calculate heart rate, speed and energy output in real time. But are they obscuring the sport’s appeal? To find out, one amateur sheds his high-tech gear

Illustration: Kerry Hyndman
By
Lee Marshall
Dec. 6, 2017 12:37 p.m. ET
ON THE JULY evening when I arrived in the Dolomites, Italy’s most handsome mountain range was shaking off the clouds that had brought summer showers to the Alta Badia valley. Above the tree line, a jagged wall of ice-scoured rock glowed creamy pink in the setting sun. But I had no appetite for such sublime views. Disaster had just struck.
I was here to take part, for the first time, in one of the great European one-day amateur cycling challenges: the Maratona dles Dolomites, a punishing 83-mile course over seven Alpine passes. Rifling through my kit, however, I’d realized that I had foolishly left my heart-rate monitor at home.
Like most of those for whom cycling is an obsession rather than a means of transport, I embrace technology. Not just the technology that allows me to go faster—carbon frames, aero handlebars, ultralightweight wheels—but the technology that tells me (among other things) just how briskly I’m moving. How quickly or slowly my pedals are turning. How many calories I’m painstakingly burning. And how all this exercise is making my heart work. I can measure the latter in terms of either beats per minute or as an average of my maximum heart rate during workouts using my Garmin cycling computer and GPS. I’ve come to depend on knowing exactly which “zone” I’m in.
The missing monitor—a chest-strapped device that communicates with the handlebar-mounted Garmin via Bluetooth—would have picked up that heart rate reading. My dejection on discovering my oversight had nothing to do with health issues. I knew from experience that even when I’m racing, my heartbeat stays well within a range most cardiologists consider safe for a 55-year-old. But how would I know, during the race, how much effort I was putting in, mile by mile, without my computer? And when I uploaded my ride to Strava—the widely used social network that allows athletes to track and measure their performances against friends and followers—where would that neat heart rate graph be, the one that often looks like an enraged porcupine?
Yes, those questions now sound pretty dumb to me too. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers on the screen.

CHANGING GEARS
Early the next day, I set off from the village of La Villa with 9,128 other cyclists. Over the next seven hours, I settled into a pace just below the point at which the pain outweighed the gain (technically, this is known as the “lactate threshold”), allowing myself some brief recovery periods, ramping up the effort when my legs felt good. I enjoyed the scenery, chatted with other cyclists, even stopped to take selfies. For the first time in a while, I actually enjoyed a race. I didn’t come anywhere near the podium, not even for my age group. Then again, I never do.
Data-obsessed athletes are fond of telling themselves, and anyone who will listen, that perceived effort can be inaccurate—that’s why they need hard data. But I know for a fact that I wouldn’t have ridden any faster with the heart monitor. It would instead have just added to my data stress. And yet until my Dolomitic revelation, I’d been seriously considering adding another pointlessly complex data field to my ride by investing in a power meter, which calculates in watts the strain exerted on the pedals or crank arm—and which can cost between $300 and $1,500.
Instead, I scaled back, eventually shedding all technology save for an iPhone to track my rides. I was, and I still am, tempted to record and gawk at data, but I realized watching the numbers rise and fall had become an obsession.
But Piet Morgan, CEO of athletic technology company Hammerhead, does not believe cycling has reached “peak data” just yet. “Cycling is at the cutting edge of athletic-data collection,” he said, because it involves two complex machines, the human body and bicycle, each of which can generate multiple readings. Rather than rejecting data out of hand, Mr. Morgan feels cyclists need to be given tools to use measurements and graphs of heart rate, power output, and cadence—the rate at which you turn the pedals—more effectively. His company’s first product was the gratifyingly simple LED-based H1 bike navigation tool. The second, which started shipping in November, is named Karoo. It’s a much more sophisticated device designed, Mr. Morgan said, to be a combination cycling computer and personal trainer. It not only flashes up cryptic figures but also adapts to each rider automatically and generates unique training plans based on factors like fatigue, diet, and stress.
This is perfectly fine if going faster is your aim. The problem is that so many cyclists become slave to the numbers even on gentle recovery rides or social outings. Club rides, the core of the amateur cyclist’s week, are often spoiled when fellow team members race ahead of the group to chase a Strava personal best. (I’ve been guilty of this myself.)
When riding a few years ago in Corsica with Simon Mottram, founder and CEO of the cultish British cycling apparel and lifestyle brand Rapha, I noticed he hadn’t strapped a GPS unit to his handlebars. Neither, it turned out, was he tracking the ride on his smartphone. When I asked him about this recently, Mr. Mottram told me that as a young cyclist in the 1980s he was an early adopter of some of the first effective cycling “cockpit instrumentation,” including the innovative Avocet speedometer. But he gave up data pretty early on, he said. “I didn’t think it was helping in any way.”
‘I realized I was behaving like an idiot. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers.’
Pressed, Mr. Mottram bluntly explained, “I find the whole idea of measuring and monitoring—even looking back at, say, the profile of your climb or what speed you did—really uninteresting. Cycling is the most incredible, beautiful, challenging sport for so many reasons. One of those is that it’s such a rich counterpoint to sitting in a conference room or an office or a tube train. And, I think, looking at screens and stuff, who cares? You want to be in the moment.”
Three months after the Maratona, I tackled another legendary Italian cycling challenge, L’Eroica: 130 miles, over 10,000 feet of climbing, with most of the route on unpaved Tuscan strade bianche or white roads, some with gradients of up to 15%. Oh, and you had to ride it on a pre-1987 vintage steel racing bike—the kind with the gear shifters on the down tube. I left my heart-rate monitor at home, on purpose this time. None of us had Garmins mounted to handlebars. They would have ruined the aesthetic, and in any case this was not a race: You won by simply making it to the end. All the data we needed was on the regular L’Eroica course markers that, with agonizing slowness, counted down the distance left to Gaiole in Chianti, our departure point and eventual destination.
Yes, I documented the exhausting but magnificent 13-hour ride on Strava using an iPhone tucked into the back pocket of my cycling jersey. I still like to tally how many kilometers I pedal each year, how many Everests I climb. But all the data—the heart rate zones, power curve? I’ll come back to those if I ever get myself a trainer. In the meantime, I’m going to leave watts to the lightbulbs.



Re: Sports focused consignment/resale store

Sheri Rosenbaum
 

There are tons of Facebook groups dedicated to selling cycling items and bikes. I've been very successful on several.


Midwest Velo Swap

Central Illinois Cycling Exchange

Tri 'n Sell It

Online Swap Meet for Cycling

Wisconsin Road Bike/Parts

Fat Bike Trader

Chicago Bike and Parts Swap


You can also post on numerous bike club FB pages what you are buying or selling.


Hope that helps

Sheri




From: BBC-Bike@... on behalf of Chris Doubek cdoubek@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 5:43 AM
To: BBC Bike Club
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Sports focused consignment/resale store
 
 

Does anyone know of a consignment or resale store that focuses on sports and perhaps cycling related gear and equipment within the greater Chicago area?

Thanks


Re: Sports focused consignment/resale store

Sean Malia
 

Play it Again Sports in Palatine- assume inventory varies but I expect they should have bikes & related equipment.

Sean Malia

Please excuse typos

On Dec 7, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Chris Doubek cdoubek@... [BBC-Bike] <BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Does anyone know of a consignment or resale store that focuses on sports and perhaps cycling related gear and equipment within the greater Chicago area?

Thanks


Today’s Wall Street Journal…enjoy

Greg Bach
 

 

Why Gadget-Obsessed Jocks Need a Data Detox
Cycling gadgets can calculate heart rate, speed and energy output in real time. But are they obscuring the sport’s appeal? To find out, one amateur sheds his high-tech gear

Illustration: Kerry Hyndman
By
Lee Marshall
Dec. 6, 2017 12:37 p.m. ET
ON THE JULY evening when I arrived in the Dolomites, Italy’s most handsome mountain range was shaking off the clouds that had brought summer showers to the Alta Badia valley. Above the tree line, a jagged wall of ice-scoured rock glowed creamy pink in the setting sun. But I had no appetite for such sublime views. Disaster had just struck.
I was here to take part, for the first time, in one of the great European one-day amateur cycling challenges: the Maratona dles Dolomites, a punishing 83-mile course over seven Alpine passes. Rifling through my kit, however, I’d realized that I had foolishly left my heart-rate monitor at home.
Like most of those for whom cycling is an obsession rather than a means of transport, I embrace technology. Not just the technology that allows me to go faster—carbon frames, aero handlebars, ultralightweight wheels—but the technology that tells me (among other things) just how briskly I’m moving. How quickly or slowly my pedals are turning. How many calories I’m painstakingly burning. And how all this exercise is making my heart work. I can measure the latter in terms of either beats per minute or as an average of my maximum heart rate during workouts using my Garmin cycling computer and GPS. I’ve come to depend on knowing exactly which “zone” I’m in.
The missing monitor—a chest-strapped device that communicates with the handlebar-mounted Garmin via Bluetooth—would have picked up that heart rate reading. My dejection on discovering my oversight had nothing to do with health issues. I knew from experience that even when I’m racing, my heartbeat stays well within a range most cardiologists consider safe for a 55-year-old. But how would I know, during the race, how much effort I was putting in, mile by mile, without my computer? And when I uploaded my ride to Strava—the widely used social network that allows athletes to track and measure their performances against friends and followers—where would that neat heart rate graph be, the one that often looks like an enraged porcupine?
Yes, those questions now sound pretty dumb to me too. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers on the screen.

CHANGING GEARS
Early the next day, I set off from the village of La Villa with 9,128 other cyclists. Over the next seven hours, I settled into a pace just below the point at which the pain outweighed the gain (technically, this is known as the “lactate threshold”), allowing myself some brief recovery periods, ramping up the effort when my legs felt good. I enjoyed the scenery, chatted with other cyclists, even stopped to take selfies. For the first time in a while, I actually enjoyed a race. I didn’t come anywhere near the podium, not even for my age group. Then again, I never do.
Data-obsessed athletes are fond of telling themselves, and anyone who will listen, that perceived effort can be inaccurate—that’s why they need hard data. But I know for a fact that I wouldn’t have ridden any faster with the heart monitor. It would instead have just added to my data stress. And yet until my Dolomitic revelation, I’d been seriously considering adding another pointlessly complex data field to my ride by investing in a power meter, which calculates in watts the strain exerted on the pedals or crank arm—and which can cost between $300 and $1,500.
Instead, I scaled back, eventually shedding all technology save for an iPhone to track my rides. I was, and I still am, tempted to record and gawk at data, but I realized watching the numbers rise and fall had become an obsession.
But Piet Morgan, CEO of athletic technology company Hammerhead, does not believe cycling has reached “peak data” just yet. “Cycling is at the cutting edge of athletic-data collection,” he said, because it involves two complex machines, the human body and bicycle, each of which can generate multiple readings. Rather than rejecting data out of hand, Mr. Morgan feels cyclists need to be given tools to use measurements and graphs of heart rate, power output, and cadence—the rate at which you turn the pedals—more effectively. His company’s first product was the gratifyingly simple LED-based H1 bike navigation tool. The second, which started shipping in November, is named Karoo. It’s a much more sophisticated device designed, Mr. Morgan said, to be a combination cycling computer and personal trainer. It not only flashes up cryptic figures but also adapts to each rider automatically and generates unique training plans based on factors like fatigue, diet, and stress.
This is perfectly fine if going faster is your aim. The problem is that so many cyclists become slave to the numbers even on gentle recovery rides or social outings. Club rides, the core of the amateur cyclist’s week, are often spoiled when fellow team members race ahead of the group to chase a Strava personal best. (I’ve been guilty of this myself.)
When riding a few years ago in Corsica with Simon Mottram, founder and CEO of the cultish British cycling apparel and lifestyle brand Rapha, I noticed he hadn’t strapped a GPS unit to his handlebars. Neither, it turned out, was he tracking the ride on his smartphone. When I asked him about this recently, Mr. Mottram told me that as a young cyclist in the 1980s he was an early adopter of some of the first effective cycling “cockpit instrumentation,” including the innovative Avocet speedometer. But he gave up data pretty early on, he said. “I didn’t think it was helping in any way.”
‘I realized I was behaving like an idiot. But when you’re a sports-data addict, all that matters are the numbers.’
Pressed, Mr. Mottram bluntly explained, “I find the whole idea of measuring and monitoring—even looking back at, say, the profile of your climb or what speed you did—really uninteresting. Cycling is the most incredible, beautiful, challenging sport for so many reasons. One of those is that it’s such a rich counterpoint to sitting in a conference room or an office or a tube train. And, I think, looking at screens and stuff, who cares? You want to be in the moment.”
Three months after the Maratona, I tackled another legendary Italian cycling challenge, L’Eroica: 130 miles, over 10,000 feet of climbing, with most of the route on unpaved Tuscan strade bianche or white roads, some with gradients of up to 15%. Oh, and you had to ride it on a pre-1987 vintage steel racing bike—the kind with the gear shifters on the down tube. I left my heart-rate monitor at home, on purpose this time. None of us had Garmins mounted to handlebars. They would have ruined the aesthetic, and in any case this was not a race: You won by simply making it to the end. All the data we needed was on the regular L’Eroica course markers that, with agonizing slowness, counted down the distance left to Gaiole in Chianti, our departure point and eventual destination.
Yes, I documented the exhausting but magnificent 13-hour ride on Strava using an iPhone tucked into the back pocket of my cycling jersey. I still like to tally how many kilometers I pedal each year, how many Everests I climb. But all the data—the heart rate zones, power curve? I’ll come back to those if I ever get myself a trainer. In the meantime, I’m going to leave watts to the lightbulbs.


Sports focused consignment/resale store

Chris Doubek (BTAP)
 

Does anyone know of a consignment or resale store that focuses on sports and perhaps cycling related gear and equipment within the greater Chicago area?

Thanks


Re: Digest Number 2377

Mike McGehee (PBM)
 

Jeff,

 

Which stand and do you have one pic?

 

Regards,

PBM

 

From: BBC-Bike@... [mailto:BBC-Bike@...] On Behalf Of J Grady jgrady@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 11:53 AM
To: No Reply ; BBC-Bike@...
Subject: RE: [BBC-Bike] Digest Number 2377

 

 

Everyone,  I have relocated to Franklin, TN!  I have a Park tools bike maintenance/repair stand for sale (https://www.facebook.com/groups/788909217806047/permalink/1742382092458750/?sale_post_id=1742382092458750 )  We will be back in the Barrington area next week 12/13.  Let me know if you are interested and we can arrange to swap!

 

It was fun riding with all of you over the years!  Hopefully our paths will cross next summer – hit or miss!

 

Jeff Grady

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: BBC-Bike@...
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 6:42 PM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Digest Number 2377

 

Yahoo! Groups

4 Messages

Digest #2377

1a

3a

Saturday Rides by "David Bergen" dbergen143

Messages

Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:31 am (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

Fri Dec 1, 2017 10:17 am (PST) . Posted by:

"Anna" annaswiet

Is it at 9 or 11?



On Fri, Dec 1, 2017 at 11:31 AM, David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike]<BBC-Bike-noreply@...> wrote:  

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time

28 miles, slower pace

Longer or shorter options available

 


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Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:33 am (PST) . Posted by:

"TJoz" tjoz7







Winter rides are here and the roads are clear!  30-ish miles Wuaconda loop starts at 9:00 from BHS. Please reply to me if interested 
Joz


Tim Jozwiak (847) 452-9557

Fri Dec 1, 2017 2:01 pm (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

It looks like we will have 2 rides tomorrow - 9:00 and 11:00
Don't forget Greg's ride on Sunday
Temps in the 20's for a high next weekend

From: BBC-Bike@... [mailto:BBC-Bike@...] On Behalf Of David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 11:32 AM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Saturday Ride - 11:00 - Barrington High School

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

Yahoo! Groups

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Smart Trainer Demo Night At Village CycleSport Barrington

Mike Page
 

Hey Club,


We are running a smart trainer demo night this Thursday at Village CycleSport Barrington. Evening starts at 6:30 with a short educational seminar and demos to follow. I thought I would extend a personal invite to you guys as some of you have expressed an interest in this topic. I hope to see you guys there.


P.S there will be beer!  


More info here -> http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Smart-Trainer-Demo---Sale.html?soid=1124115034158&aid=5Vzn8qKy9HQ


Mike Page
Village CycleSport
234 W Northwest HW
Barrington, 60010
(847) 382-9200



Re: Digest Number 2377

J Grady <jgrady@...>
 

… you can FB message, text (8478944837) or call me (8478944837) about this.  JG

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: J Grady
Sent: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 11:53 AM
To: No Reply; BBC-Bike@...
Subject: RE: [BBC-Bike] Digest Number 2377

 

Everyone,  I have relocated to Franklin, TN!  I have a Park tools bike maintenance/repair stand for sale (https://www.facebook.com/groups/788909217806047/permalink/1742382092458750/?sale_post_id=1742382092458750 )  We will be back in the Barrington area next week 12/13.  Let me know if you are interested and we can arrange to swap!

 

It was fun riding with all of you over the years!  Hopefully our paths will cross next summer – hit or miss!

 

Jeff Grady

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: BBC-Bike@...
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 6:42 PM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Digest Number 2377

 

Yahoo! Groups

4 Messages

Digest #2377

1a

3a

Saturday Rides by "David Bergen" dbergen143

Messages

Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:31 am (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

Fri Dec 1, 2017 10:17 am (PST) . Posted by:

"Anna" annaswiet

Is it at 9 or 11?



On Fri, Dec 1, 2017 at 11:31 AM, David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike] wrote:  

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time

28 miles, slower pace

Longer or shorter options available

 


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Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:33 am (PST) . Posted by:

"TJoz" tjoz7







Winter rides are here and the roads are clear!  30-ish miles Wuaconda loop starts at 9:00 from BHS. Please reply to me if interested 
Joz


Tim Jozwiak (847) 452-9557

Fri Dec 1, 2017 2:01 pm (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

It looks like we will have 2 rides tomorrow - 9:00 and 11:00
Don't forget Greg's ride on Sunday
Temps in the 20's for a high next weekend

From: BBC-Bike@... [mailto:BBC-Bike@...] On Behalf Of David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 11:32 AM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Saturday Ride - 11:00 - Barrington High School

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

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Re: Digest Number 2377

J Grady <jgrady@...>
 

Everyone,  I have relocated to Franklin, TN!  I have a Park tools bike maintenance/repair stand for sale (https://www.facebook.com/groups/788909217806047/permalink/1742382092458750/?sale_post_id=1742382092458750 )  We will be back in the Barrington area next week 12/13.  Let me know if you are interested and we can arrange to swap!

 

It was fun riding with all of you over the years!  Hopefully our paths will cross next summer – hit or miss!

 

Jeff Grady

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: BBC-Bike@...
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 6:42 PM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Digest Number 2377

 

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4 Messages

Digest #2377

1a

3a

Saturday Rides by "David Bergen" dbergen143

Messages

Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:31 am (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

Fri Dec 1, 2017 10:17 am (PST) . Posted by:

"Anna" annaswiet

Is it at 9 or 11?



On Fri, Dec 1, 2017 at 11:31 AM, David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike] wrote:  

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time

28 miles, slower pace

Longer or shorter options available

 


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Fri Dec 1, 2017 9:33 am (PST) . Posted by:

"TJoz" tjoz7







Winter rides are here and the roads are clear!  30-ish miles Wuaconda loop starts at 9:00 from BHS. Please reply to me if interested 
Joz


Tim Jozwiak (847) 452-9557

Fri Dec 1, 2017 2:01 pm (PST) . Posted by:

"David Bergen" dbergen143

It looks like we will have 2 rides tomorrow - 9:00 and 11:00
Don't forget Greg's ride on Sunday
Temps in the 20's for a high next weekend

From: BBC-Bike@... [mailto:BBC-Bike@...] On Behalf Of David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 11:32 AM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Saturday Ride - 11:00 - Barrington High School

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time
28 miles, slower pace
Longer or shorter options available

[https://ridewithgps.com/routes/full/12757520.png?secret_hash=1f266297d76f1c117ba381552148dbd44330217d]

Yahoo! Groups

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Supermoon and 15th Annual Amlings Cycle Holiday Toy Ride

Sheri Rosenbaum
 

Hi everyone,

First, a big thank you to Greg and Sue for hosting the 2nd annual Supermoon ride. 20 riders came out and had a great ride. Who would have thought 50s in December...and at night.


Second, many of you on the ride commented on how bright my headlight was. It is a Garmin Varia UT800 (so 800 lumens). I'm testing for review in RBR. It's pretty cool as it is synced with my Garmin 1000 and gets brighter as I speed up and dimmer as I slow down. It was still working even after 2 hours of riding. So far I'm pretty impressed.


Third, if you are  looking to get into the holiday spirit, Amlings has their annual toy ride coming up Friday, Dec 15th (see below). I've done it for several years. It's about 21 miles round trip. The ride down is a slowwww roll but you get a police escort from their shop in Niles to Chicago where we get fed a free yummy breakfast. Yes, there's bacon!!! You are on your own to ride back. Some people do a pub crawl back, but there's no police escort unless you are drunk and riding.


For those of you who I wont see until after the holidays, wishing you all the best and a happy New Year.

Be safe and enjoy the ride

Sheri




From: Joe Reichert on behalf of Joe Reichert
Sent: Saturday, December 2, 2017 8:33 AM
To: luv2bike80@...
Subject: 15th Annual Amlings Cycle Holiday Toy Ride - Update!
 
December, 2017
Dear Sheri,

This is the first update to all those folks that have registered for this years ride, as well as those that have ridden in the past, but may not have signed up just yet.  (You know who you are!)
 
The 15th Annual Amling's Cycle Holiday Toy Ride is ON!  Mark your calendar for Friday December 15th, 2015, at 6:30 am!  The ride is just 2 weeks away and the weather forecast looks GREAT!
Toy Ride Updates!

Get in the club!
Registration is going well for this years ride, we already have about 70 folks ready to ride!  But if you haven't registered yet don't delay.  If you think you are going to ride, please do register.  It makes things much easier for us the day of the event.  Thanks!  

Click HERE!

Also, get your friends and family to join the fun.  This event is definitely a case of "the more, the merrier!'

Toys - Bring 'em on! 
The toys have started to roll in, but we are a long way from our goal of over 3,000 toys.  Keep 'em coming!  (Just a side note, there is always a big shortage of gifts for older kids and 'tweens.  Please remember they love the Holidays too...)

If you opt not to ride, you can always stop by the store to drop off toys.  Or you might consider starting a toy drive at work or have your kids pick one toy they would like to donate to children less fortunate.   

Trailers!!
We need your trailers and the sooner the better, so we can get them loaded up!  We lost our trailer sponsor a couple of years ago, so we are asking for trailer loans.  We have a few from years past, but not nearly enough.  

The trailers will be cleaned and ready to pick up shortly after the ride.


Spread the word!
Could you put up a poster or pass out some brochures?  If so let us know and we'll figure out how to get them to you!  

The Toy Ride has it's own page on FaceBook!  Take a look
here

Join the Amlings Cycle community in this wonderful event and bring a smile to a young child's face this holiday season. You can still register to ride or volunteer behind the scenes by clicking here.

Register Now!

There will be a couple more updates coming mid-week with any last minute details on timing, parking, or any other issues.  Please watch your inbox.

Thanks for your continued support of our event.  It really means a lot to so many people.

Sincerely,
 

Joe Reichert
Amlings Cycle
Amlings Cycle, 8140 N. Milwaukee Ave., Niles, IL 60714
Sent by joe@... in collaboration with
Constant Contact


Pics from

Tom Cramer
 

Have a great day,

Tom Cramer
Sent from my iPhone 847-308-7012


Saturday Rides

David Bergen
 

It looks like we will have 2 rides tomorrow – 9:00 and 11:00

Don’t forget Greg’s ride on Sunday

Temps in the 20’s for a high next weekend

 

From: BBC-Bike@... [mailto:BBC-Bike@...] On Behalf Of David Bergen davidb@... [BBC-Bike]
Sent: Friday, December 1, 2017 11:32 AM
To: BBC-Bike@...
Subject: [BBC-Bike] Saturday Ride - 11:00 - Barrington High School

 

 

47 degrees, sunny, light winds at ride time

28 miles, slower pace

Longer or shorter options available

 

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