Date   

Bull valley?

steveojano
 

Does anyone have a good route to Bull valley? I don't want to blindly plot a route and then end up having to ride some street with a 50 mph speed limit. 

Thanks so much everyone.


Saturday Ride - 8:00 - Barrington High School - 30,40,50,60

David Bergen
 

Saturday Ride – 8:00 - Barrington High School - 30,40,50 mile options

4 options…30, 40, 50, or 60 miles

The first 18 miles we will be weaving thru various neighborhoods to a stop at Lakewood forest preserve.  From there, you will decide on a easy 12 mile return or a 40/50/60 mile return. The longer riders will go an additional 11 miles to Darrel and Roberts where they will have to decide between 40,50 or 60. There will be a stop at the gas station at Bonner and Rand for food/water/etc.

As always, route subject to change due to construction, group decision, or ride organizers whim

18 mile start http://ridewithgps.com/routes/7787592

 

12 mile return

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/5143402

 

 

 

22 mile return

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/5143390

 

32 mile return

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/5143443

 42 mile return

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/8596936

BBC members, support the bike shop that supports our club. Your active membership is good for the following discounts at both Village CycleSport locations in Barrington and Arlington Heights.  

  • In-Stock accessories: 15% Off
  • Special Order Accessories: 10% Off
  • Service Labor: 15% Off
  • Bikes: 7% Off
  • Electronics (Smart Trainers, GPS Computers ext...): 10% Off

Checkout their website at: Village CycleSport | Arlington Heights & Barrington, IL

The program is a personal discount only. Applies only to active BBC members.

 


Thursday Night Ride - 5:30 - From Flesk Brewery

David Bergen
 

 

I will not be there this week.  Here is the default route unless someone wants to lead a different route/ride

 Thursday Night Ride – 5:30 - From Flesk Brewery.... +/- 25 miles

Our route will take us by the church at 5:35 in case you are running late

This is our generic weekly map and is subject to minor changes.

No need to reply, just show up

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/30055588

BBC members, support the bike shop that supports our club. Your active membership is good for the following discounts at both Village CycleSport locations in Barrington and Arlington Heights.  

  • In-Stock accessories: 15% Off
  • Special Order Accessories: 10% Off
  • Service Labor: 15% Off
  • Bikes: 7% Off
  • Electronics (Smart Trainers, GPS Computers ext...): 10% Off

Checkout their website at: Village CycleSport | Arlington Heights & Barrington, IL

The program is a personal discount only. Applies only to active BBC members.

 

 

_._,_._,_


Tuesday night ride

Anna Swiet
 

Tuesday night Hilly Billy ride starts at 5:45 from Flesk Brewery
Here is the typical route map, see you at the start


Anna 


2013 Specialized Roubaix Comp Compact, 54cm frame

Sheri Rosenbaum
 

A friend of mine is selling one of her bikes. She’s taken very good care of this bike and it has minor scratches which can be expected over the years.

 

Details below and pictures attached.

 

2013 Specialized Roubaix Comp Compact, 54cm frame

 

FRAME:  Specialized FACT 8r carbon, FACT TM construction, 1-1/8" to 1-3/8" HT, compact race design, Zertz, internal rear brake cable, threaded BB, 54cm

FORK:  Specialized Roubaix, FACT carbon, full monocoque, Zertz

SEATPOST:  Specialized Comp, FACT carbon

HANDLEBARS:  Specialized Hover Expert Alloy

FRONT BRAKE:  Shimano Ultegra

REAR BRAKE:  Shimano Ultegra

FRONT DERAILLEUR:  Shimano 105

REAR DERAILLEUR:  Shimano Ultegra     

SHIFT LEVERS:  Shimano Ultegra STI

CASSETTE:  Shimano GRX 10-speed, 12-28T

CHAIN:  Shimano Ultegra 10-Speed

CRANKSET:  Shimano Ultegra compact

CHAINRINGS:  50/34      

WHEELS:  DT Axis 3.0

TIRES:  Continental Grand Prix 4000 II (700 x 25c)

SADDLE:  Selle Italia X1 Flow

PEDALS:  Nylon flat test ride w/ reflectors

 

Asking: $1,100

Contact: Hollie Long at 630-309-1128 or hollielong@... with any questions or to see the bike.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


BBC 2021 Tour Picks Status - Rest Day 2

Ruben Medina
 

BBC Tour de France Contestants,

We have two tied for the lead after 15 Stages of this year's Tour de France.

Leading our contest as of Rest Day 2 are:

Ken Kriescher 28 points
Darryl Racki 28 points
Ruben Medina 38 points

There are still a lot of mountains to climb in this upcoming last week of the Tour; but if the Tour ended today...

Ken would win because he would have Gerraint Thomas (47th place) as his tiebreaker. Darryl would be next with Tao Goeghan Hart (72nd place) as his tiebreaker.

It should be an exciting last week of the Tour!

Attached is the spreadsheet with the results up to this point.


Re: WSJ The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France

steveojano
 

And then.....

he tests positive for PED and we all moan.  Lol

Just joking.  He's a phenom and deserves a 35th!  Congrats to him so far.  What a great story he's building!!


On Sat, Jul 10, 2021, 7:22 PM Tom Snitzer <snitzoid@...> wrote:
The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France
On the verge of leaving the sport, a reborn rider equals Eddy Merckx’s legendary record of 34 stage wins
Mark Cavendish celebrates as he crosses the finish line after taking the 13th stage of the Tour de France on Friday. 

By Jason Gay
Updated July 9, 2021 2:42 pm ET


To appreciate the full picture of what Mark Cavendish is doing right now at the Tour de France—to understand why this story is so thrillingly emotional and unexpected that it’s making grown, grizzled cycling fans weepy—you’ve got to appreciate where Cavendish was, not terribly long ago.

And where was he?

He was all but out of the sport. Done. Kaput. A shell of his former, spandexed self.

There are comebacks in sports, and then there is this one: Mark Cavendish, the 36-year-old missile from the Isle of Man, back from the brink and born anew, winning four stages at the 2021 Tour and tying bike legend’s Eddy Merckx’s record of 34 stages Friday with a brilliant closing gallop in Carcassonne.

It’s a feat so improbable, not even Cavendish was willing to consider it, until maybe a few days ago.

Why would he? A few months back, it would have been outrageous to think Cavendish could even start the 2021 Tour. He hadn’t won a stage of cycling’s grandest event since 2016. He hadn’t even been invited to participate in it since 2018.

A close-to-unbeatable tornado in his 20s, Cavendish fell apart as he entered his mid-30s. He endured bad luck, bad crashes, awkward fits with mediocre teams, and was flattened by successive bouts with the Epstein-Barr virus, which drained his energy and stripped his unshakable sprinter’s confidence. Depression reared from the darkness.

A once-swaggering phenom was humbled. The man they call “Cav” collected 30 Tour stage victories by 2016, and then, abruptly, he couldn’t win at all. He kept pushing on, turning the pedals, but it became difficult to watch. After a grueling race last fall, he tearfully told a reporter: “That’s perhaps the last race of my career.”

Please understand: Bike sprinting is an underrated head game. You’ve got to have ferociously strong legs, yes, and it helps to have some talented teammates to deliver you close to the finish line, but in the final, furious meters, you have to believe, unequivocally, to barrel out of that blurry pack at 45 MPH and gun it for the finish, elbows wide, head over handlebars, brakes be damned.

Cav wasn’t sure if he could believe again.

“I was kind of lost in the wilderness,” Cavendish told me in April.

The sport had moved on.

“It’d just felt like everybody had given up,” he said.

Cavendish had to cobble together his own, last-ditch offer just to stick around. Last winter, he grabbed a lifeline from an old team, Deceuninck-Quick-Step, and a bike sponsor, Specialized, but expectations were minimal. Maybe Cav could help out with the young riders. Maybe he could swipe a victory at a C-list race.

Win stages of the Tour de France? Close the gap with Merckx’s 34, a mark which loomed over cycling like DiMaggio’s 56?

Ha, ha. No way. It was such a ridiculous proposition that Cavendish grew to loathe being asked about it.

In the spring, he showed a flash of his old self, winning four sprint stages of the Tour of Turkey. It was a stirring moment, enough to walk away from the sport with his head held high, but it wasn’t France in July. Cavendish wasn’t mentioned in Deceuninck-Quick-Step’s Tour de France plans. The team had a strong, younger sprinter in Sam Bennett, who’d won the green jersey as the Tour’s top speedster in 2020.

They were set. Cav would again watch the Tour on TV.

Then Cavendish got lucky—lucky in the grim way a cyclist doesn’t ever want to be lucky, but fortunate still. Bennett, struggling to rehabilitate from a knee injury, got scratched from the Tour roster. Cavendish was summoned off the bench, less than a week before the start.

And since then, it’s been like turning a switch, back to the brilliant old days. Cavendish has stepped into the cockpit of a cycling powerhouse—Deceuninck-Quick-Step is an outfit in which Cavendish has a reigning world champion, Julian Alaphilippe, helping to protect him in the pack, and other teammates have lugged Cavendish through difficult mountain stages. In the sprints, Cavendish barely has to stick his nose into the wind until the closing kilometer.

But you know what? He still has to do it in those closing meters, and he’s done it, turning on those diabolical jets everyone presumed were long, long gone. He’s been speedy and crafty and calm under pressure. This may not be peak Cavendish cannonball, but in a Tour that has seen some top competition like Caleb Ewan and Peter Sagan depart with injuries, it’s been plenty enough.

Cav’s joy has been—well—a joy. Late edition Cavendish brims with gratitude, to his teammates, to Deceuninck-Quick-Step boss Patrick Lefevere, to the entire sport, his family, and to his fans who never gave up. It seems he, too, can’t quite believe it. The Brash Missile has gone Warm and Fuzzy. A sport is swooning.

Even Eddy seems OK with it. Merckx, aka “The Cannibal,” is cycling’s Babe Ruth—and, as he recently reminded La Gazzetta dello Sport, he won his 34 Tour stages in an assortment of sprints, mountain climbs and time trials. There’s no comparison between what Eddy did and what Cav’s doing as a sprint specialist. Still, the 76-year-old respectfully allowed: “He’s been through a difficult time and has fallen in love with cycling again. That’s a great message for young people in the sport.”

It is indeed. And it isn’t yet done. More mountains are coming, which will be another slog for Cavendish, but there are a pair of sprint stages late, including a final romp on Sunday, July 18 on the cobbles of the Champs-Élysées. A record-breaker could be coming, but I would caution you that nothing in cycling’s ever given, that luck can change in an instant, and you can never count on an outcome, but you already know that. You’re watching Mark Cavendish win at the Tour de France again, and it’s enough to take anyone’s breath away.  

--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


Re: WSJ The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France

Carol Curtis
 

Thanks for the article. He’s such a joy to watch. 
Carol


On Jul 10, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


Thanks for the article Tom.

Yes, the achievement of 34 Tour de France stage wins is impressive. Hats off to Mark Cavendish for that; and too bad that Caleb Ewan who was arguably this Tour's strongest sprinter crashed out of the Tour on Stage 3.

However, we need to put Cavendish's achievement into context. The man he ties, Eddy Merckx, won in the mountains, in time trials, on stages built for sprinters - in short, on every type of stage. 

While Merckx was winning his 34 stages he was also competing for the overall win on General Classification. His team had to ride for him on every and all types of stages, not just protecting him and leading him out on 5 or 6 sprint stages.

Eddy Merckx is one of four men to win the Tour de France 5 times. It is not realistic for Mark Cavendish to aspire to win even one Tour because he is strictly a sprint specialist.

It's a wonderful story for Cav to resurrect his career and once again win big stages in big races. There can be no doubt that he will be remembered as a dominant sprinter.

<1625971912756blob.jpg>







On Saturday, July 10, 2021, 05:22:32 PM PDT, Tom Snitzer <snitzoid@...> wrote:


The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France
On the verge of leaving the sport, a reborn rider equals Eddy Merckx’s legendary record of 34 stage wins
Mark Cavendish celebrates as he crosses the finish line after taking the 13th stage of the Tour de France on Friday. 

By Jason Gay
Updated July 9, 2021 2:42 pm ET


To appreciate the full picture of what Mark Cavendish is doing right now at the Tour de France—to understand why this story is so thrillingly emotional and unexpected that it’s making grown, grizzled cycling fans weepy—you’ve got to appreciate where Cavendish was, not terribly long ago.

And where was he?

He was all but out of the sport. Done. Kaput. A shell of his former, spandexed self.

There are comebacks in sports, and then there is this one: Mark Cavendish, the 36-year-old missile from the Isle of Man, back from the brink and born anew, winning four stages at the 2021 Tour and tying bike legend’s Eddy Merckx’s record of 34 stages Friday with a brilliant closing gallop in Carcassonne.

It’s a feat so improbable, not even Cavendish was willing to consider it, until maybe a few days ago.

Why would he? A few months back, it would have been outrageous to think Cavendish could even start the 2021 Tour. He hadn’t won a stage of cycling’s grandest event since 2016. He hadn’t even been invited to participate in it since 2018.

A close-to-unbeatable tornado in his 20s, Cavendish fell apart as he entered his mid-30s. He endured bad luck, bad crashes, awkward fits with mediocre teams, and was flattened by successive bouts with the Epstein-Barr virus, which drained his energy and stripped his unshakable sprinter’s confidence. Depression reared from the darkness.

A once-swaggering phenom was humbled. The man they call “Cav” collected 30 Tour stage victories by 2016, and then, abruptly, he couldn’t win at all. He kept pushing on, turning the pedals, but it became difficult to watch. After a grueling race last fall, he tearfully told a reporter: “That’s perhaps the last race of my career.”

Please understand: Bike sprinting is an underrated head game. You’ve got to have ferociously strong legs, yes, and it helps to have some talented teammates to deliver you close to the finish line, but in the final, furious meters, you have to believe, unequivocally, to barrel out of that blurry pack at 45 MPH and gun it for the finish, elbows wide, head over handlebars, brakes be damned.

Cav wasn’t sure if he could believe again.

“I was kind of lost in the wilderness,” Cavendish told me in April.

The sport had moved on.

“It’d just felt like everybody had given up,” he said.

Cavendish had to cobble together his own, last-ditch offer just to stick around. Last winter, he grabbed a lifeline from an old team, Deceuninck-Quick-Step, and a bike sponsor, Specialized, but expectations were minimal. Maybe Cav could help out with the young riders. Maybe he could swipe a victory at a C-list race.

Win stages of the Tour de France? Close the gap with Merckx’s 34, a mark which loomed over cycling like DiMaggio’s 56?

Ha, ha. No way. It was such a ridiculous proposition that Cavendish grew to loathe being asked about it.

In the spring, he showed a flash of his old self, winning four sprint stages of the Tour of Turkey. It was a stirring moment, enough to walk away from the sport with his head held high, but it wasn’t France in July. Cavendish wasn’t mentioned in Deceuninck-Quick-Step’s Tour de France plans. The team had a strong, younger sprinter in Sam Bennett, who’d won the green jersey as the Tour’s top speedster in 2020.

They were set. Cav would again watch the Tour on TV.

Then Cavendish got lucky—lucky in the grim way a cyclist doesn’t ever want to be lucky, but fortunate still. Bennett, struggling to rehabilitate from a knee injury, got scratched from the Tour roster. Cavendish was summoned off the bench, less than a week before the start.

And since then, it’s been like turning a switch, back to the brilliant old days. Cavendish has stepped into the cockpit of a cycling powerhouse—Deceuninck-Quick-Step is an outfit in which Cavendish has a reigning world champion, Julian Alaphilippe, helping to protect him in the pack, and other teammates have lugged Cavendish through difficult mountain stages. In the sprints, Cavendish barely has to stick his nose into the wind until the closing kilometer.

But you know what? He still has to do it in those closing meters, and he’s done it, turning on those diabolical jets everyone presumed were long, long gone. He’s been speedy and crafty and calm under pressure. This may not be peak Cavendish cannonball, but in a Tour that has seen some top competition like Caleb Ewan and Peter Sagan depart with injuries, it’s been plenty enough.

Cav’s joy has been—well—a joy. Late edition Cavendish brims with gratitude, to his teammates, to Deceuninck-Quick-Step boss Patrick Lefevere, to the entire sport, his family, and to his fans who never gave up. It seems he, too, can’t quite believe it. The Brash Missile has gone Warm and Fuzzy. A sport is swooning.

Even Eddy seems OK with it. Merckx, aka “The Cannibal,” is cycling’s Babe Ruth—and, as he recently reminded La Gazzetta dello Sport, he won his 34 Tour stages in an assortment of sprints, mountain climbs and time trials. There’s no comparison between what Eddy did and what Cav’s doing as a sprint specialist. Still, the 76-year-old respectfully allowed: “He’s been through a difficult time and has fallen in love with cycling again. That’s a great message for young people in the sport.”

It is indeed. And it isn’t yet done. More mountains are coming, which will be another slog for Cavendish, but there are a pair of sprint stages late, including a final romp on Sunday, July 18 on the cobbles of the Champs-Élysées. A record-breaker could be coming, but I would caution you that nothing in cycling’s ever given, that luck can change in an instant, and you can never count on an outcome, but you already know that. You’re watching Mark Cavendish win at the Tour de France again, and it’s enough to take anyone’s breath away.  

--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631
<1625971912756blob.jpg>


Re: SUNDAY RIDE BHS 8:00 AM -- Moved to Zwift

Tom Cramer
 

It looks like a rain out tomorrow and since it's raining now and appears will keep going fo awhile I doubt the roads will be dry by 8:00.

To avoid further injuries I am going to switch to a Zwift ride tomorrow morning at 8:00am. In honor of the Tour de France we will be riding virtually in douse-France. https://whatsonzwift.com/world/france/route/douce-france

If your following me on Zwift, you should have received an invite to ride. If not reply to me(only) and I will send a invite.
 
If it ends up being dry outside and you want to post a ride please do so.

Ride On
Tom 


From: general@BBC-Bike.groups.io <general@BBC-Bike.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Cramer <tcramer@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 8, 2021 8:12:16 PM
To: BBC groups io <bbc-bike@groups.io>
Subject: [BBC-Bike] SUNDAY RIDE BHS 8:00 AM --34ish miles / 44 Mile Options [EXTERNAL EMAIL - CAUTION]
 

I will lead this Sunday’s Ride Weather Permitting (showing 50% chance of Rain, 64/70deg).

 

My go to Prairie/Dundee Route just because I know it the best J

 

The Ride with GPS links are below taken from our website. INO we won’t be going on 90, we just never fixed the map yet.

 

Riders who want the shorter route will turn on River Road others wanting a longer route will head up 31 or Blackhawk (if street by Port Edwards is open now) to Cary/Algonquin Rd.

 

Stops in East Dundee and Walgreens in Cary.

 

Prairie Dundee 34

34

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/21918114

 

Prairie/East Dundee 44

44

https://ridewithgps.com/routes/23867837

 

 

 

Check your email for last minute cancellation due to weather.

 

 

Tom Cramer

847-308-7012 Cell

 


CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The content of this message and any files transmitted with it is a confidential and proprietary business communication, which is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Any use, distribution, duplication or disclosure by any other person or entity is strictly prohibited. If you are not an intended recipient or this has been received in error, please notify the sender and immediately delete all copies of this communication.

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The content of this message and any files transmitted with it is a confidential and proprietary business communication, which is solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). Any use, distribution, duplication or disclosure by any other person or entity is strictly prohibited. If you are not an intended recipient or this has been received in error, please notify the sender and immediately delete all copies of this communication.


Re: WSJ The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France

Ruben Medina
 

Thanks for the article Tom.

Yes, the achievement of 34 Tour de France stage wins is impressive. Hats off to Mark Cavendish for that; and too bad that Caleb Ewan who was arguably this Tour's strongest sprinter crashed out of the Tour on Stage 3.

However, we need to put Cavendish's achievement into context. The man he ties, Eddy Merckx, won in the mountains, in time trials, on stages built for sprinters - in short, on every type of stage. 

While Merckx was winning his 34 stages he was also competing for the overall win on General Classification. His team had to ride for him on every and all types of stages, not just protecting him and leading him out on 5 or 6 sprint stages.

Eddy Merckx is one of four men to win the Tour de France 5 times. It is not realistic for Mark Cavendish to aspire to win even one Tour because he is strictly a sprint specialist.

It's a wonderful story for Cav to resurrect his career and once again win big stages in big races. There can be no doubt that he will be remembered as a dominant sprinter.








On Saturday, July 10, 2021, 05:22:32 PM PDT, Tom Snitzer <snitzoid@...> wrote:


The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France
On the verge of leaving the sport, a reborn rider equals Eddy Merckx’s legendary record of 34 stage wins
Mark Cavendish celebrates as he crosses the finish line after taking the 13th stage of the Tour de France on Friday. 

By Jason Gay
Updated July 9, 2021 2:42 pm ET


To appreciate the full picture of what Mark Cavendish is doing right now at the Tour de France—to understand why this story is so thrillingly emotional and unexpected that it’s making grown, grizzled cycling fans weepy—you’ve got to appreciate where Cavendish was, not terribly long ago.

And where was he?

He was all but out of the sport. Done. Kaput. A shell of his former, spandexed self.

There are comebacks in sports, and then there is this one: Mark Cavendish, the 36-year-old missile from the Isle of Man, back from the brink and born anew, winning four stages at the 2021 Tour and tying bike legend’s Eddy Merckx’s record of 34 stages Friday with a brilliant closing gallop in Carcassonne.

It’s a feat so improbable, not even Cavendish was willing to consider it, until maybe a few days ago.

Why would he? A few months back, it would have been outrageous to think Cavendish could even start the 2021 Tour. He hadn’t won a stage of cycling’s grandest event since 2016. He hadn’t even been invited to participate in it since 2018.

A close-to-unbeatable tornado in his 20s, Cavendish fell apart as he entered his mid-30s. He endured bad luck, bad crashes, awkward fits with mediocre teams, and was flattened by successive bouts with the Epstein-Barr virus, which drained his energy and stripped his unshakable sprinter’s confidence. Depression reared from the darkness.

A once-swaggering phenom was humbled. The man they call “Cav” collected 30 Tour stage victories by 2016, and then, abruptly, he couldn’t win at all. He kept pushing on, turning the pedals, but it became difficult to watch. After a grueling race last fall, he tearfully told a reporter: “That’s perhaps the last race of my career.”

Please understand: Bike sprinting is an underrated head game. You’ve got to have ferociously strong legs, yes, and it helps to have some talented teammates to deliver you close to the finish line, but in the final, furious meters, you have to believe, unequivocally, to barrel out of that blurry pack at 45 MPH and gun it for the finish, elbows wide, head over handlebars, brakes be damned.

Cav wasn’t sure if he could believe again.

“I was kind of lost in the wilderness,” Cavendish told me in April.

The sport had moved on.

“It’d just felt like everybody had given up,” he said.

Cavendish had to cobble together his own, last-ditch offer just to stick around. Last winter, he grabbed a lifeline from an old team, Deceuninck-Quick-Step, and a bike sponsor, Specialized, but expectations were minimal. Maybe Cav could help out with the young riders. Maybe he could swipe a victory at a C-list race.

Win stages of the Tour de France? Close the gap with Merckx’s 34, a mark which loomed over cycling like DiMaggio’s 56?

Ha, ha. No way. It was such a ridiculous proposition that Cavendish grew to loathe being asked about it.

In the spring, he showed a flash of his old self, winning four sprint stages of the Tour of Turkey. It was a stirring moment, enough to walk away from the sport with his head held high, but it wasn’t France in July. Cavendish wasn’t mentioned in Deceuninck-Quick-Step’s Tour de France plans. The team had a strong, younger sprinter in Sam Bennett, who’d won the green jersey as the Tour’s top speedster in 2020.

They were set. Cav would again watch the Tour on TV.

Then Cavendish got lucky—lucky in the grim way a cyclist doesn’t ever want to be lucky, but fortunate still. Bennett, struggling to rehabilitate from a knee injury, got scratched from the Tour roster. Cavendish was summoned off the bench, less than a week before the start.

And since then, it’s been like turning a switch, back to the brilliant old days. Cavendish has stepped into the cockpit of a cycling powerhouse—Deceuninck-Quick-Step is an outfit in which Cavendish has a reigning world champion, Julian Alaphilippe, helping to protect him in the pack, and other teammates have lugged Cavendish through difficult mountain stages. In the sprints, Cavendish barely has to stick his nose into the wind until the closing kilometer.

But you know what? He still has to do it in those closing meters, and he’s done it, turning on those diabolical jets everyone presumed were long, long gone. He’s been speedy and crafty and calm under pressure. This may not be peak Cavendish cannonball, but in a Tour that has seen some top competition like Caleb Ewan and Peter Sagan depart with injuries, it’s been plenty enough.

Cav’s joy has been—well—a joy. Late edition Cavendish brims with gratitude, to his teammates, to Deceuninck-Quick-Step boss Patrick Lefevere, to the entire sport, his family, and to his fans who never gave up. It seems he, too, can’t quite believe it. The Brash Missile has gone Warm and Fuzzy. A sport is swooning.

Even Eddy seems OK with it. Merckx, aka “The Cannibal,” is cycling’s Babe Ruth—and, as he recently reminded La Gazzetta dello Sport, he won his 34 Tour stages in an assortment of sprints, mountain climbs and time trials. There’s no comparison between what Eddy did and what Cav’s doing as a sprint specialist. Still, the 76-year-old respectfully allowed: “He’s been through a difficult time and has fallen in love with cycling again. That’s a great message for young people in the sport.”

It is indeed. And it isn’t yet done. More mountains are coming, which will be another slog for Cavendish, but there are a pair of sprint stages late, including a final romp on Sunday, July 18 on the cobbles of the Champs-Élysées. A record-breaker could be coming, but I would caution you that nothing in cycling’s ever given, that luck can change in an instant, and you can never count on an outcome, but you already know that. You’re watching Mark Cavendish win at the Tour de France again, and it’s enough to take anyone’s breath away.  

--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


WSJ The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France

Tom Snitzer
 

The Emotional, Outrageous Comeback of Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France
On the verge of leaving the sport, a reborn rider equals Eddy Merckx’s legendary record of 34 stage wins
Mark Cavendish celebrates as he crosses the finish line after taking the 13th stage of the Tour de France on Friday. 

By Jason Gay
Updated July 9, 2021 2:42 pm ET


To appreciate the full picture of what Mark Cavendish is doing right now at the Tour de France—to understand why this story is so thrillingly emotional and unexpected that it’s making grown, grizzled cycling fans weepy—you’ve got to appreciate where Cavendish was, not terribly long ago.

And where was he?

He was all but out of the sport. Done. Kaput. A shell of his former, spandexed self.

There are comebacks in sports, and then there is this one: Mark Cavendish, the 36-year-old missile from the Isle of Man, back from the brink and born anew, winning four stages at the 2021 Tour and tying bike legend’s Eddy Merckx’s record of 34 stages Friday with a brilliant closing gallop in Carcassonne.

It’s a feat so improbable, not even Cavendish was willing to consider it, until maybe a few days ago.

Why would he? A few months back, it would have been outrageous to think Cavendish could even start the 2021 Tour. He hadn’t won a stage of cycling’s grandest event since 2016. He hadn’t even been invited to participate in it since 2018.

A close-to-unbeatable tornado in his 20s, Cavendish fell apart as he entered his mid-30s. He endured bad luck, bad crashes, awkward fits with mediocre teams, and was flattened by successive bouts with the Epstein-Barr virus, which drained his energy and stripped his unshakable sprinter’s confidence. Depression reared from the darkness.

A once-swaggering phenom was humbled. The man they call “Cav” collected 30 Tour stage victories by 2016, and then, abruptly, he couldn’t win at all. He kept pushing on, turning the pedals, but it became difficult to watch. After a grueling race last fall, he tearfully told a reporter: “That’s perhaps the last race of my career.”

Please understand: Bike sprinting is an underrated head game. You’ve got to have ferociously strong legs, yes, and it helps to have some talented teammates to deliver you close to the finish line, but in the final, furious meters, you have to believe, unequivocally, to barrel out of that blurry pack at 45 MPH and gun it for the finish, elbows wide, head over handlebars, brakes be damned.

Cav wasn’t sure if he could believe again.

“I was kind of lost in the wilderness,” Cavendish told me in April.

The sport had moved on.

“It’d just felt like everybody had given up,” he said.

Cavendish had to cobble together his own, last-ditch offer just to stick around. Last winter, he grabbed a lifeline from an old team, Deceuninck-Quick-Step, and a bike sponsor, Specialized, but expectations were minimal. Maybe Cav could help out with the young riders. Maybe he could swipe a victory at a C-list race.

Win stages of the Tour de France? Close the gap with Merckx’s 34, a mark which loomed over cycling like DiMaggio’s 56?

Ha, ha. No way. It was such a ridiculous proposition that Cavendish grew to loathe being asked about it.

In the spring, he showed a flash of his old self, winning four sprint stages of the Tour of Turkey. It was a stirring moment, enough to walk away from the sport with his head held high, but it wasn’t France in July. Cavendish wasn’t mentioned in Deceuninck-Quick-Step’s Tour de France plans. The team had a strong, younger sprinter in Sam Bennett, who’d won the green jersey as the Tour’s top speedster in 2020.

They were set. Cav would again watch the Tour on TV.

Then Cavendish got lucky—lucky in the grim way a cyclist doesn’t ever want to be lucky, but fortunate still. Bennett, struggling to rehabilitate from a knee injury, got scratched from the Tour roster. Cavendish was summoned off the bench, less than a week before the start.

And since then, it’s been like turning a switch, back to the brilliant old days. Cavendish has stepped into the cockpit of a cycling powerhouse—Deceuninck-Quick-Step is an outfit in which Cavendish has a reigning world champion, Julian Alaphilippe, helping to protect him in the pack, and other teammates have lugged Cavendish through difficult mountain stages. In the sprints, Cavendish barely has to stick his nose into the wind until the closing kilometer.

But you know what? He still has to do it in those closing meters, and he’s done it, turning on those diabolical jets everyone presumed were long, long gone. He’s been speedy and crafty and calm under pressure. This may not be peak Cavendish cannonball, but in a Tour that has seen some top competition like Caleb Ewan and Peter Sagan depart with injuries, it’s been plenty enough.

Cav’s joy has been—well—a joy. Late edition Cavendish brims with gratitude, to his teammates, to Deceuninck-Quick-Step boss Patrick Lefevere, to the entire sport, his family, and to his fans who never gave up. It seems he, too, can’t quite believe it. The Brash Missile has gone Warm and Fuzzy. A sport is swooning.

Even Eddy seems OK with it. Merckx, aka “The Cannibal,” is cycling’s Babe Ruth—and, as he recently reminded La Gazzetta dello Sport, he won his 34 Tour stages in an assortment of sprints, mountain climbs and time trials. There’s no comparison between what Eddy did and what Cav’s doing as a sprint specialist. Still, the 76-year-old respectfully allowed: “He’s been through a difficult time and has fallen in love with cycling again. That’s a great message for young people in the sport.”

It is indeed. And it isn’t yet done. More mountains are coming, which will be another slog for Cavendish, but there are a pair of sprint stages late, including a final romp on Sunday, July 18 on the cobbles of the Champs-Élysées. A record-breaker could be coming, but I would caution you that nothing in cycling’s ever given, that luck can change in an instant, and you can never count on an outcome, but you already know that. You’re watching Mark Cavendish win at the Tour de France again, and it’s enough to take anyone’s breath away.  

--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


Intelligentsia Crit Race in West Dundee

Jin Chon
 

Group, there is a crit racing this Friday in West Dundee. Schedule is below and the Pro Women race at 5pm and Pro Men at race at 6:45pm. If you want to try the course at 6:15 you can ride the crit course and clock tour time!

July 16th




Thanks,
Jin Chon


Re: Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed

Will Skinner
 

Fun ride today, tks for the route enhancements James. Nice stop in McHenry at Hidden Pearl Coffee.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 10, 2021, at 10:52 AM, lcalhoun@... wrote:


 Will - Depending on the weather, i will come.

Elizabeth Calhoun

Managing Director

Signuum, LLC

E: lcalhoun@...

P: 630-310-2787

W: http://www.signuum.com 



From: general@BBC-Bike.groups.io <general@BBC-Bike.groups.io> on behalf of Will Skinner <will_skinner@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2021 5:54 AM
To: ruben.medina27@... <ruben.medina27@...>
Cc: David Bergen <davidb@...>; bbc-bike@groups.io <bbc-bike@groups.io>; tinasmith7934@... <tinasmith7934@...>
Subject: Re: [BBC-Bike] Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed
 
My plan is the Mc Henry 42 mile route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/13976683

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:29 PM, Will Skinner <will_skinner@...> wrote:

 Hi folks, not sure if anyone posted a ride for tomorrow. Im thinking to ride. Will meet anyone interested at BHS to roll out at 8am.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 8, 2021, at 5:24 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


I'm riding in San Diego so I will not be posting or leading any BBC rides for the next week.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 11:24:04 AM PDT, tinasmith7934 via groups.io <tinasmith7934@...> wrote:


Hi All,
I'm unavailable to organize Saturday ride due to another commitment.  
Take care. 
Tina


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 1:11 PM, David Bergen
<davidb@...> wrote:

Ride leaders needed for this weekend’s rides

 

 


Re: Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed

lcalhoun@signuum.com
 

 Will - Depending on the weather, i will come.

Elizabeth Calhoun

Managing Director

Signuum, LLC

E: lcalhoun@...

P: 630-310-2787

W: http://www.signuum.com 



From: general@BBC-Bike.groups.io <general@BBC-Bike.groups.io> on behalf of Will Skinner <will_skinner@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2021 5:54 AM
To: ruben.medina27@... <ruben.medina27@...>
Cc: David Bergen <davidb@...>; bbc-bike@groups.io <bbc-bike@groups.io>; tinasmith7934@... <tinasmith7934@...>
Subject: Re: [BBC-Bike] Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed
 
My plan is the Mc Henry 42 mile route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/13976683

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:29 PM, Will Skinner <will_skinner@...> wrote:

 Hi folks, not sure if anyone posted a ride for tomorrow. Im thinking to ride. Will meet anyone interested at BHS to roll out at 8am.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 8, 2021, at 5:24 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


I'm riding in San Diego so I will not be posting or leading any BBC rides for the next week.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 11:24:04 AM PDT, tinasmith7934 via groups.io <tinasmith7934@...> wrote:


Hi All,
I'm unavailable to organize Saturday ride due to another commitment.  
Take care. 
Tina


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 1:11 PM, David Bergen
<davidb@...> wrote:

Ride leaders needed for this weekend’s rides

 

 


Re: Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed

Greg Crowther
 

I’ll see you at 8 at the HS


On Jul 10, 2021, at 5:54 AM, Will Skinner via groups.io <will_skinner@...> wrote:

 My plan is the Mc Henry 42 mile route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/13976683

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:29 PM, Will Skinner <will_skinner@...> wrote:

 Hi folks, not sure if anyone posted a ride for tomorrow. Im thinking to ride. Will meet anyone interested at BHS to roll out at 8am.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 8, 2021, at 5:24 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


I'm riding in San Diego so I will not be posting or leading any BBC rides for the next week.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 11:24:04 AM PDT, tinasmith7934 via groups.io <tinasmith7934@...> wrote:


Hi All,
I'm unavailable to organize Saturday ride due to another commitment.  
Take care. 
Tina


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 1:11 PM, David Bergen
<davidb@...> wrote:

Ride leaders needed for this weekend’s rides

 

 


Re: Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed

Will Skinner
 

My plan is the Mc Henry 42 mile route https://ridewithgps.com/routes/13976683

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 9, 2021, at 8:29 PM, Will Skinner <will_skinner@...> wrote:

 Hi folks, not sure if anyone posted a ride for tomorrow. Im thinking to ride. Will meet anyone interested at BHS to roll out at 8am.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 8, 2021, at 5:24 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


I'm riding in San Diego so I will not be posting or leading any BBC rides for the next week.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 11:24:04 AM PDT, tinasmith7934 via groups.io <tinasmith7934@...> wrote:


Hi All,
I'm unavailable to organize Saturday ride due to another commitment.  
Take care. 
Tina


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 1:11 PM, David Bergen
<davidb@...> wrote:

Ride leaders needed for this weekend’s rides

 

 


Re: Swimming?

Catherine McCord
 

Long course is the best. 

The Barrington High school pool is 25 m in the summer. 

I prefer to swim outside, Barrington Park District pool.  25 yards three dedicated lanes  die lap swimming noon to 8:00 pm

The Barrington Area Masters is a good team to practice with. 

Catherine 

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 19:22 Alex Raikhman <alex.raikhman@...> wrote:
Olympic size,  during summer's lap swim times:


On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 6:18 PM steveojano <stayput@...> wrote:
I know this is the bike club.... But I also know we have a few triathletes here too.

I'm wondering where folks swim laps near Barrington.

Thx!

Steve

--

Catherine A. McCord

224-422-8515  cell


Re: Weekend Rides - Ride Leaders Needed

Will Skinner
 

Hi folks, not sure if anyone posted a ride for tomorrow. Im thinking to ride. Will meet anyone interested at BHS to roll out at 8am.

Will Skinner
+1 919 348 5555

On Jul 8, 2021, at 5:24 PM, Ruben Medina via groups.io <ruben.medina27@...> wrote:


I'm riding in San Diego so I will not be posting or leading any BBC rides for the next week.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 11:24:04 AM PDT, tinasmith7934 via groups.io <tinasmith7934@...> wrote:


Hi All,
I'm unavailable to organize Saturday ride due to another commitment.  
Take care. 
Tina


On Wed, Jul 7, 2021 at 1:11 PM, David Bergen
<davidb@...> wrote:

Ride leaders needed for this weekend’s rides

 

 


Re: Swimming?

Catherine McCord
 

Barrington Park District pool and Barrington Area Masters. 

 

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 19:18 steveojano <stayput@...> wrote:
I know this is the bike club.... But I also know we have a few triathletes here too.

I'm wondering where folks swim laps near Barrington.

Thx!

Steve

--

Catherine A. McCord

224-422-8515  cell


Re: Swimming?

Alex Raikhman
 

Olympic size,  during summer's lap swim times:


On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 6:18 PM steveojano <stayput@...> wrote:
I know this is the bike club.... But I also know we have a few triathletes here too.

I'm wondering where folks swim laps near Barrington.

Thx!

Steve

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