Date   

Garmin Varia Radar review

Sheri Rosenbaum
 

Hi folks,
A while back there was some emails back and forth about wearing a mirror vs rear radar vs both. Garmin sent me their two new Varia radars to test/review...one with a rear light and one without. Here's the link to my review. I always wear a mirror on the road and now I'll only ride with the Varia and a mirror. Just the other day on Miller my radar went off showing a car approaching fast. I glanced in my mirror only to see the white pick up (why is it always a white pick up?) not moving over. I screamed at my riding buddy "he's going to buzz us watch out". Sure enough he came within inches of our handlebars. I think without the radar and mirror combination we would have been hit. I'm a believer. 


Be safe,
Sheri


WSJ Social distancing on his bike (Evergreen Colo)

Tom Snitzer
 

Screen Shot 2020-09-01 at 5.14.35 AM.png

A Colorado mountain biker has tried everything from setting Strava records to an isolated 485-mile ride with his wife from Denver to Durango
Kevin Williams mountain bikes near his home in Evergreen, Colo
By Jen Murphy
Aug. 29, 2020 6:00 am ET

Back in March, Kevin Williams was training for two 100-mile mountain bike races that he knew could get canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. The 30-year-old Small Business Administration lender lives in Evergreen, Colo., and logging miles used to be as simple as hopping in his car to access trail networks. Over the past five months, he’s had to get creative with his workouts to stay flexible and safe due to both the virus and recent wildfires.

When the governor issued stay-at-home orders in late March, Mr. Williams committed to only riding straight from his door. Often this involves riding on less-trafficked dirt roads around his neighborhood, and even trails he finds less appealing.

Mr. Williams was registered in the open pro division of both races and was hoping to place in the top 20. He would normally see other riders on the trails and would use them to push his pace. He now had to find motivation from Strava, an app that uses GPS to track performance and shows how your times stack up with other cyclists.


“When you’re limited to only roads and trails out the front door, you find yourself competing with your neighbors,” he says. Mr. Williams owns a handful of KOMs, or King of the Mountain titles, in his area. In Strava-speak, that means he’s posted the top time on a segment of a ride.

He’s never ridden in person with his neighbor, Campbell Levy, but the two have become virtual competitors. “The first time I met him, he was wearing his Leadville 100 belt buckle,” Mr. Williams says, referring to the award given to those who complete the grueling 100-mile, high-altitude mountain-bike race in Leadville, Colo. “He has a swagger about him. We follow each other on Strava. If he logs a faster climb, I’m going out the next day to beat him.”

Mr. Williams says he got faster on the bike during early quarantine months, but when his races were canceled in May, he needed a new goal. “It’s always nice to have something to work toward,” he says. In late May, he and his wife, Erika Williams, started training to ride the Colorado Trail, a 485-mile path from Denver to Durango, much of which sits above 10,000 feet.

“By summer, trails were getting more crowded for cycling and hiking and camping,” he says. “Bikepacking was a way for us to bike and camp and get further away from people.” Bikepacking is a type of bike touring that combines mountain biking with backpacking. Cyclists ride self-supported, filling bags on their bike with food, clothes and camping equipment.

Mr. Williams had to adjust his training to focus on endurance and efficiency versus speed. The couple departed on July 31, averaging 30 to 70 miles a day over 10 days. “We saw two to three people a day,” he says. “I feel lucky we’ve been able to get out in nature still.”

The Workout
Mr. Williams rides five to six days a week and has adjusted when, where and how he rides fairly dramatically in response to the coronavirus. “I have shifted my ride locations and schedule to make sure I entirely avoid or limit my contact with others,” he says.

“I have found it isn’t an option to ride my mountain bike on the weekends due to trail congestion, so I’ve typically been slipping out in the evenings midweek to a trail network close to my house.” Mr. Williams has been working remotely from home, his days often starting at 6 a.m. “I get a little stir crazy,” he says. “Evening rides have been a good way to unwind and process the day.”

On weekends, he uses his road bike to explore gravel roads. He aims for 10 to 12 hours of saddle time a week. Large wildfires that broke out across western Colorado in July and August have affected the air quality. As a result, he says, he’s riding 20% to 30% slower and doing shorter rides. Instead of focusing on Strava times, he says he’s been enjoying mountain biking with his wife.


The Diet
Caffeine fix: “I drink coffee all morning but cut myself off at noon,” he says.
Quarantine indulgence: “My brother-in-law stayed with us for a few months and he is a professional chef in New York City,” he says. “He’d make me Vietnamese lettuce wraps with bacon, tomato, Sriracha sauce and mayo for lunch.”
Go-to weeknight dish: Homemade barbecue pizza.
Trail fuel: “When you’re biking up to 12 hours a day and carrying your own food, you need lightweight, calorie-dense nutrition,” he says. Trail butter, a mix of nut butter and trail mix, comes in squeezable pouches that deliver nearly 800 calories.

Essential Gear
Santa Cruz Stigmata Rival Build cyclocross bike: $3,600
Pivot Mach 4 SL Pro XO1 Build mountain bike: $7,000

Bikepacking 101
Bikepacking is a relatively new sport that involves going point to point on your bike and being fairly self-sufficient, says Ally Mabry, the resident bikepacking expert at the Adventure Cycling Association in Missoula, Mont.

“It’s like camping via bike,” she says. “And like camping, preparation is key.” Ms. Mabry says you don’t need a fancy bike or bags. She prefers gravel bikes, which are designed to ride on and off road. Because you’re carrying your supplies, it’s important to get used to riding a loaded bike.

“It helps to keep the heaviest stuff low to the ground and directly under you,” she says. “If you put the heavy stuff in a bag on the handlebars, steering feels uncomfortable, and if it’s in your seat pack you will feel the drag going uphill.”

She tries to keep the weight of her gear between 30 and 60 pounds. She always packs a repair kit and triangle reflectors in case she ends up on the trail or road after dark.

Newbies shouldn’t bite off more than they can chew, she says. “Saddle time is crucial,” Ms. Mabry says. “You want to feel confident you can go the distance and don’t underestimate elevation and altitude.” She urges bikepackers to ride with a buddy and to share their route with a friend.

What’s your workout? Tell us at workout@...
--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


Re: Crystal Lake Avenue West of Terra Cotta Road Construction

Carol Curtis
 

Thanks Jeff


On Aug 31, 2020, at 9:00 AM, Jeff Meckert <rocket33@...> wrote:


If you are riding west of Terra Cotta on Crystal Lake Ave., beware of road construction west up to old Crystal Lake downtown.  The road narrows to 1 lane heading EAST at the METRA tracks and the sidewalk is unusable. I slipped in between the barriers as no construction was active on Sunday.

Once you cross MAIN street your are back to 2 lanes but there is road work up to Walkup Ave.  Road is passable but bumpy/gravely.  


Crystal Lake Avenue West of Terra Cotta Road Construction

Jeff Meckert
 

If you are riding west of Terra Cotta on Crystal Lake Ave., beware of road construction west up to old Crystal Lake downtown.  The road narrows to 1 lane heading EAST at the METRA tracks and the sidewalk is unusable. I slipped in between the barriers as no construction was active on Sunday.

Once you cross MAIN street your are back to 2 lanes but there is road work up to Walkup Ave.  Road is passable but bumpy/gravely.  


Re: LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

kelly clayton
 

Have a great ride and be safe. Unfortunately, I can't help in the bag department. 


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 1:44 PM Lena Chon via groups.io <lmnchon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi All,

I am attempting  a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance.  It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐

I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.

 If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!

Thanks,
Lena




Re: WSJ The Tour de France Was Obsessed With Germs Long Before the Pandemic

Carol Curtis
 

Thanks Tom. That was very I teresti g. Looking forward to watching the Tour. Viva le Tour!

Carol


On Aug 28, 2020, at 11:58 AM, Tom Snitzer <snitzoid@...> wrote:


The Tour de France Was Obsessed With Germs Long Before the Pandemic
The strangest edition of the world’s most famous bike race begins on Saturday, amid rising coronavirus cases in France

By Joshua Robinson

When the world suddenly learned this year that it needed to use hand sanitizer all of the time, one group of skinny men in Lycra already knew the drill. Tour de France cyclists had been fretting about hand-washing and microbes for years.

To protect their immune systems over a grueling three-week bike race, they had long ago done away with touchy-feely greetings and embraced the merits of self-quarantine at the first sign of a sniffle. Doing well at the Tour de France was too important to take any risks. What riders didn’t realize was how ready they would be for 2020’s Tour de Pandemic.

“We were all germaphobes before,” said American rider Tejay van Garderen, of Team EF Education First. “In the Covid era, it’s like that on steroids.”

With the Tour due to begin on Saturday, even as cases rise again in France, the sanitary protocols for teams and riders have never been more important—even if there are no guarantees the race will reach the finish line in Paris on Sept. 20.

The Tour, more French than cheese for dessert, never considered canceling the race. Organizers simply delayed the race by seven weeks and came up with a system of moving bubbles. Every team can have up to eight riders and 22 staffers, who must undergo regular testing and remain sealed off from the outside world as they dash around the country.

Inside those team bubbles, which will bounce every day between the race course and a different hotel almost every night, life will be even more ascetic than usual. There will be no autographs, no buffets, and no roommates. Riders have been warned that the riskiest part of their day isn’t the 50 mile-per-hour descent off a mountain—it’s when they take off their masks and let down their guards at dinner.

But more than any other athletes, pro cyclists get it. After leaving every ounce of energy on the road, they know exactly how vulnerable they are.

“We didn’t shake hands for many, many years before Covid,” said Dave Brailsford, the general manager of Team Ineos (formerly Team Sky).

As the architect of the detail-obsessed “marginal gains” approach to running a sports team, Brailsford has been fixated on minimizing marginal germs for nearly two decades. When he formalized his findings around 2008, he called the protocol Zero Days, for zero days of training or racing lost to “avoidable illness or injury.”

That meant buying hand sanitizer in industrial quantities, years before it became the object of national treasure hunts. It meant traveling to the Tour with the team’s own mattresses and hypoallergenic sheets. And it meant sending advance squads to every one of the nearly 20 team hotels along the race route to vacuum the rooms, disinfect TV remotes, and scrub the shower taps.

“Many people used to take the mickey out of us, rib us a little bit, because they thought it was over the top,” Brailsford said. “Lo and behold, now the whole world is doing the same thing.”


Thibaut Pinot of Groupama-FDJ, left, Daniel Martinez of EF Pro Cycling team, center, and Guillaume Martin of Cofidis, right, wear protective masks on the podium for the Criterium du Dauphine.
PHOTO: ANNE CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/POOL/SHUTTERSTOCK
Ineos has upgraded the program for 2020—and also named it like an action-movie sequel. This weekend, “Zero Days: Covid Plus” is coming to a bike race near you. Its star: a masked team staffer who works in the shadows, never crossing paths with the team. He is the Designated Shopper.

Armed with a grocery list to feed eight riders who burn 6,000 calories a day, his job is to raid the nearest supermarket and simply leave the day’s supplies “at the edge of the bubble,” as Brailsford called it. While the team eats dinner and prepares for another day of racing, our hero presses on to the next town and the next supermarket.

Team Ineos is hardly the only one taking extreme measures. The team with the best chance to deny Ineos a sixth-straight victory here is a Dutch outfit named Jumbo-Visma. To win the Tour in the time of coronavirus, they tapped Bert Blocken, a professor of engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology who normally serves as their aerodynamics guru. What the team wanted this year wasn’t his wind tunnel, but some expertise on how particles float through the air.

By particles, they meant the virus. And by the air, they meant inside the team bus where riders can spend more than a quarter of their waking hours at the Tour. So after extensive testing, Blocken recommended using air cleaners on the bus and in hotel rooms to reduce the density of droplets floating around the riders.

“In this case, we were interested in the saliva particles,” said Blocken, who pointed out that the technology was similar to kitchen hoods. “We found it was quite effective.”

The one environment the teams can’t control happens to be the most important one: the actual race. The main bunch of riders known as the peloton is in fact a rolling biohazard. For three weeks, roughly 160 men will spend their days riding as close to each other as commuters in a packed subway car, inhaling an airborne cocktail of sweat, spit, and other people’s breath. Riders have always known that in the third week of the Tour, when immune systems are at their most threadbare, illnesses tend to spread through the peloton like rumors.

“If you want to transmit a sickness, just give it to a bike rider,” said Team Mitchelton-Scott rider Jack Bauer. “He’ll pass it on to all his colleagues in the blink of an eye.”

To prevent that, the Tour is counting on a rolling testing regime and keeping the riders as isolated as possible. A race that would normally see millions of supporters flock to the roadsides is barring fans from starts and finishes and will restrict some access on narrow mountain passes. While organizers can’t police every inch of a 2,100-mile race, they have asked that anyone watching in person wear a mask.

“There is no protocol that is bulletproof,” said Matt White, Mitchelton-Scott’s head sports director. “We’re doing everything we can and at the end of the day, that’s going to have to be good enough.”

RELATED
The Tour de France’s Most-Abused Substance: Hand Sanitizer (July 19, 2017)
There isn’t much room for error. Tour organizers originally warned that two positive tests inside a team’s 30-person bubble would see the entire squad ejected from the race. Already, Team Lotto-Soudal reported on Thursday that two staffers had tested positive and sent them home, along with their roommates. For teams, the biggest fear is being blown off the road by a couple of false positives.

The rules are still being tweaked before the start on Saturday and organizers will likely do away with two-strike ejections. What won’t change is the eerie scene of starting the world’s most famous bike race with only a fraction of the fans lining the streets and a nagging feeling that anyone could be a vector for infection.

“You look at everyone you encounter with a raised eyebrow, like ‘Stay away from me,’” Van Garderen said. “It’s a little crazy. But hopefully if we do all those things, we can reach Paris.”
--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


WSJ The Tour de France Was Obsessed With Germs Long Before the Pandemic

Tom Snitzer
 

The Tour de France Was Obsessed With Germs Long Before the Pandemic
The strangest edition of the world’s most famous bike race begins on Saturday, amid rising coronavirus cases in France

By Joshua Robinson

When the world suddenly learned this year that it needed to use hand sanitizer all of the time, one group of skinny men in Lycra already knew the drill. Tour de France cyclists had been fretting about hand-washing and microbes for years.

To protect their immune systems over a grueling three-week bike race, they had long ago done away with touchy-feely greetings and embraced the merits of self-quarantine at the first sign of a sniffle. Doing well at the Tour de France was too important to take any risks. What riders didn’t realize was how ready they would be for 2020’s Tour de Pandemic.

“We were all germaphobes before,” said American rider Tejay van Garderen, of Team EF Education First. “In the Covid era, it’s like that on steroids.”

With the Tour due to begin on Saturday, even as cases rise again in France, the sanitary protocols for teams and riders have never been more important—even if there are no guarantees the race will reach the finish line in Paris on Sept. 20.

The Tour, more French than cheese for dessert, never considered canceling the race. Organizers simply delayed the race by seven weeks and came up with a system of moving bubbles. Every team can have up to eight riders and 22 staffers, who must undergo regular testing and remain sealed off from the outside world as they dash around the country.

Inside those team bubbles, which will bounce every day between the race course and a different hotel almost every night, life will be even more ascetic than usual. There will be no autographs, no buffets, and no roommates. Riders have been warned that the riskiest part of their day isn’t the 50 mile-per-hour descent off a mountain—it’s when they take off their masks and let down their guards at dinner.

But more than any other athletes, pro cyclists get it. After leaving every ounce of energy on the road, they know exactly how vulnerable they are.

“We didn’t shake hands for many, many years before Covid,” said Dave Brailsford, the general manager of Team Ineos (formerly Team Sky).

As the architect of the detail-obsessed “marginal gains” approach to running a sports team, Brailsford has been fixated on minimizing marginal germs for nearly two decades. When he formalized his findings around 2008, he called the protocol Zero Days, for zero days of training or racing lost to “avoidable illness or injury.”

That meant buying hand sanitizer in industrial quantities, years before it became the object of national treasure hunts. It meant traveling to the Tour with the team’s own mattresses and hypoallergenic sheets. And it meant sending advance squads to every one of the nearly 20 team hotels along the race route to vacuum the rooms, disinfect TV remotes, and scrub the shower taps.

“Many people used to take the mickey out of us, rib us a little bit, because they thought it was over the top,” Brailsford said. “Lo and behold, now the whole world is doing the same thing.”


Thibaut Pinot of Groupama-FDJ, left, Daniel Martinez of EF Pro Cycling team, center, and Guillaume Martin of Cofidis, right, wear protective masks on the podium for the Criterium du Dauphine.
PHOTO: ANNE CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/POOL/SHUTTERSTOCK
Ineos has upgraded the program for 2020—and also named it like an action-movie sequel. This weekend, “Zero Days: Covid Plus” is coming to a bike race near you. Its star: a masked team staffer who works in the shadows, never crossing paths with the team. He is the Designated Shopper.

Armed with a grocery list to feed eight riders who burn 6,000 calories a day, his job is to raid the nearest supermarket and simply leave the day’s supplies “at the edge of the bubble,” as Brailsford called it. While the team eats dinner and prepares for another day of racing, our hero presses on to the next town and the next supermarket.

Team Ineos is hardly the only one taking extreme measures. The team with the best chance to deny Ineos a sixth-straight victory here is a Dutch outfit named Jumbo-Visma. To win the Tour in the time of coronavirus, they tapped Bert Blocken, a professor of engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology who normally serves as their aerodynamics guru. What the team wanted this year wasn’t his wind tunnel, but some expertise on how particles float through the air.

By particles, they meant the virus. And by the air, they meant inside the team bus where riders can spend more than a quarter of their waking hours at the Tour. So after extensive testing, Blocken recommended using air cleaners on the bus and in hotel rooms to reduce the density of droplets floating around the riders.

“In this case, we were interested in the saliva particles,” said Blocken, who pointed out that the technology was similar to kitchen hoods. “We found it was quite effective.”

The one environment the teams can’t control happens to be the most important one: the actual race. The main bunch of riders known as the peloton is in fact a rolling biohazard. For three weeks, roughly 160 men will spend their days riding as close to each other as commuters in a packed subway car, inhaling an airborne cocktail of sweat, spit, and other people’s breath. Riders have always known that in the third week of the Tour, when immune systems are at their most threadbare, illnesses tend to spread through the peloton like rumors.

“If you want to transmit a sickness, just give it to a bike rider,” said Team Mitchelton-Scott rider Jack Bauer. “He’ll pass it on to all his colleagues in the blink of an eye.”

To prevent that, the Tour is counting on a rolling testing regime and keeping the riders as isolated as possible. A race that would normally see millions of supporters flock to the roadsides is barring fans from starts and finishes and will restrict some access on narrow mountain passes. While organizers can’t police every inch of a 2,100-mile race, they have asked that anyone watching in person wear a mask.

“There is no protocol that is bulletproof,” said Matt White, Mitchelton-Scott’s head sports director. “We’re doing everything we can and at the end of the day, that’s going to have to be good enough.”

RELATED
The Tour de France’s Most-Abused Substance: Hand Sanitizer (July 19, 2017)
There isn’t much room for error. Tour organizers originally warned that two positive tests inside a team’s 30-person bubble would see the entire squad ejected from the race. Already, Team Lotto-Soudal reported on Thursday that two staffers had tested positive and sent them home, along with their roommates. For teams, the biggest fear is being blown off the road by a couple of false positives.

The rules are still being tweaked before the start on Saturday and organizers will likely do away with two-strike ejections. What won’t change is the eerie scene of starting the world’s most famous bike race with only a fraction of the fans lining the streets and a nagging feeling that anyone could be a vector for infection.

“You look at everyone you encounter with a raised eyebrow, like ‘Stay away from me,’” Van Garderen said. “It’s a little crazy. But hopefully if we do all those things, we can reach Paris.”
--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


Re: LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

Cindy Kessler
 

GO LENA!!!

Sorry I can not help with the bag, but I can cheer you on.  :)  

GO LENA!!!  



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Carol Curtis via groups.io" <SpinAholic@...>
Date: 8/27/20 2:33 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: lmnchon@...
Cc: BBC Groups Io <BBC-Bike@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [BBC-Bike] LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

You go girl! You’re my hero!

Carol
> On Aug 27, 2020, at 1:44 PM, Lena Chon via groups.io <lmnchon@...> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I am attempting  a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance.  It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐
>
> I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.
>
> If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!
>
> Thanks,
> Lena
>
>
>





Re: LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

steveojano
 

*you're


Sorry for the typo

On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 2:34 PM Steve <stayput@...> wrote:
If you get a sea to summit dry bag (or similar product) then your not limited by the bag you use since that dry bag would just be the "liner" in the bag you attach to your bike.  Gives you more optionality.  Just my $0.02 from my experience.

On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 1:44 PM Lena Chon via groups.io <lmnchon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi All,

I am attempting  a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance.  It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐

I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.

 If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!

Thanks,
Lena




Re: LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

steveojano
 

If you get a sea to summit dry bag (or similar product) then your not limited by the bag you use since that dry bag would just be the "liner" in the bag you attach to your bike.  Gives you more optionality.  Just my $0.02 from my experience.


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 1:44 PM Lena Chon via groups.io <lmnchon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi All,

I am attempting  a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance.  It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐

I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.

 If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!

Thanks,
Lena




Re: LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

Carol Curtis
 

You go girl! You’re my hero!

Carol

On Aug 27, 2020, at 1:44 PM, Lena Chon via groups.io <lmnchon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi All,

I am attempting a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance. It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐

I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.

If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!

Thanks,
Lena



LOOKING for...Water proof Seat pack medium size (11L)

Lena Chon
 

Hi All,

I am attempting a 600km brevet next weekend. Testing out the water for ultra endurance. It’s hard to know what bags would fit.🧐

I am looking for a water proof seat pack, medium size(11L) my frame is 52, so I can’t have anything too big or it will rub my tire.

If you have one laying around and no longer need, I would be happy to purchase from you!

Thanks,
Lena


WSJ Chris Froome Left Off Tour de France Squad

Tom Snitzer
 

Chris Froome Left Off Tour de France Squad
The four-time champion will instead make the Vuelta a Espana his final Grand Tour for Team Ineos

Four-time Tour de France champion Chris Froome was omitted by Team Ineos for this year’s race.
PHOTO: OLI SCARFF/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
By Joshua Robinson
Aug. 19, 2020 11:01 am ET

PARIS—The greatest cycling career of the 21st century took a dramatic turn last summer when Chris Froome pulled a move he had managed a million times before. He tried to blow his nose.

But when a gust of wind caught him with one hand off the bars, the sport’s unstoppable force (a four-time Tour de France winner) suddenly met an immovable object (a low wall). The 35-mile-per-hour collision left Froome with a broken neck, elbow, femur, and hip along with several fractured ribs. Most people would have considered themselves lucky to walk again. Froome, then 34, set his sights slightly higher. He wanted to get back to the biggest race in cycling.

The problem, after 12 months of grueling work, is that his team won’t take him. Team Ineos (formerly Team Sky) announced on Wednesday that it would pin its hopes of winning an eighth Tour de France in nine years on Egan Bernal. When the race begins on Aug. 29 in Nice, Froome will be at home preparing for the Vuelta a Espana.

“Chris is a legend of our sport, a true champion who has demonstrated incredible grit and determination to come back from his crash last year,” Team Ineos general manager Dave Brailsford said. “The Vuelta gives him that little bit more time to continue his progress to the top level.”

In the 12 months it took Froome to get back to major races, the entire sport seemed to change around him. He is no longer the best, or even the second best rider on his own team. Those would be Bernal, the 23-year-old from Colombia who won the 2019 Tour in Froome’s absence, and Geraint Thomas, the Welshman who rode to victory in 2018 and will target the Giro d’Italia.

Froome has also returned to find the team with three Tour champions on its roster in an unusual position: Ineos is somehow an underdog. The bookmakers’ favorite is instead the star-studded Team Jumbo-Visma, led by Primoz Roglic of Slovenia. They showed why by taking the fight straight to Ineos during this month’s Critérium du Dauphiné, the Alpine stage race that serves as a Tour tuneup.

“Don’t think we didn’t want to attack them,” said French Tour hopeful Thibaut Pinot of Team Groupama-FDJ. “They’re just going too fast.”

Had the Tour come in its normal slot in July, Ineos might not have considered Froome at all. His fitness would have fallen far short of what’s required to tear around France with the leaders for three weeks. But few athletes have benefited more from the great sports reshuffle of 2020 than Froome. He spent the extra two months grinding away in virtual rides in his garage and toiling up the mountains of the French Riviera just to give himself a chance.

Though Bernal had said publicly that he hoped to lean on Froome’s Grand Tour experience—no rider this century has spent more days in the leader’s yellow jersey—Froome wasn’t in strong enough shape to be useful. It’s hard to hide in a sport driven by comprehensive daily readings of a rider’s power output. And Ineos, a team more focused on numbers than most accounting firms, isn’t known for basing decisions on sentiment.

“I’m still finding the race rhythm,” Froome said at the Dauphiné, where he struggled to keep pace with the front-runners. “But I’m feeling better and better.”

What is now clear is that the Vuelta, which starts on Oct. 20 in the Basque Country, will be Froome’s last Grand Tour for the sport’s most dominant outfit. At the end of the season, he will join Israel Start-Up Nation on a lavish three-year contract to be its uncontested leader on the road. Froome is convinced that the team, currently in its first year at the top level, can put him in the rarefied atmosphere of five-time Tour champions—even if no one else is.

“Given his achievements in the sport, Chris is understandably keen to have sole team leadership in the next chapter of his career—which is not something we are able to guarantee him at this point,” Brailsford said. “A move away from Team Ineos can give him that certainty.”

The move only materialized after Israel Start-Up Nation owner, the Israeli-Canadian billionaire Sylvan Adams, read in the cycling press that Froome was less than thrilled with his situation at Ineos. So Adams did what any ambitious sports executive does in these times: he made a Zoom date.

“There it was, for everybody to see,” Adams said. “I don’t think I would have had the chutzpah to call him up and ask him to come over had he not indicated that such a consideration was possible.”

Adams and Froome have yet to meet face to face since they first began negotiations. But with access to all of Froome’s training data over the past couple of years, Adams and his squad felt they had enough to make an informed—and expensive—decision. Froome’s contract has been widely reported to be worth $5 million a year for three seasons.

“We could see his numbers climbing towards what they were before. And we believe that Chris will get all the way back,” Adams said. “He’s almost there right now—he’s within 1- or 2%.”

Adams recognizes that those 1% or 2% are the difference between chasing a Tour de France podium and rolling with no-names in the bunch. The Dauphiné suggested that Froome was still closer to the latter than joining the likes of Eddy Merckx and Bernard Hinault in the club of five-time winners.

“I’m really happy just to be racing again,” Froome said. “But keeping that in mind, I’ve only had a handful of days racing in over a year’s time.”
--


Thomas Snitzer
427 S Pine Ave.
Arlington Heights, Il. 60005
Cel (847) 847 8631


In Pro Cycling, Men Race Longer But Women Race Harder | Outside Online

Brad Peacock
 


Re: Fw: CN To Close Main Street Crossing Aug. 24-28

Rich Marisie
 

Thank you.




On Wednesday, August 12, 2020, 10:24 AM, Anna Swiet via groups.io <annaswiet@...> wrote:

This closure will affect many of you driving/biking/walking on Lake Cook Rd.

Anna 


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Village of Barrington <constantcontact@...>
To: "annaswiet@..." <annaswiet@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2020, 08:55:25 AM CDT
Subject: CN To Close Main Street Crossing Aug. 24-28

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
CN Railroad Crossing to Close at
Main Street (Lake-Cook Road) August 24-28

Canadian National Railroad has informed the Village that it will be closing the track crossing on Main Street (Lake-Cook Road) just west of Lageschulte Street from Monday August 24 through Friday August 28th to complete necessary crossing repairs. This closure will impact both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. A signed detour route will be in place during this closure.

Canadian National and Lake County Department of Transportation have both confirmed that this Main Street closure will only take place once south Hart Road at Route 14 has been reopened. This section of Hart Road is planned to reopen by Friday, August 21st and will be part of the detour route during the Main Street closure.  




200 S. Hough Street | Barrington, IL 60010
(847) 304-3400 | barrington-il.gov
We are always interested in your comments; please e-mail us at constantcontact@....
Village of Barrington | 200 S. Hough Street, 200 S. Hough Street,
Barrington, IL 60010
Unsubscribe annaswiet@...
Update Profile | About our service provider
Sent by constantcontact@... powered by
Trusted Email from Constant Contact - Try it FREE today.


Fw: CN To Close Main Street Crossing Aug. 24-28

Anna Swiet
 

This closure will affect many of you driving/biking/walking on Lake Cook Rd.

Anna 


----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Village of Barrington <constantcontact@...>
To: "annaswiet@..." <annaswiet@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2020, 08:55:25 AM CDT
Subject: CN To Close Main Street Crossing Aug. 24-28

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
CN Railroad Crossing to Close at
Main Street (Lake-Cook Road) August 24-28

Canadian National Railroad has informed the Village that it will be closing the track crossing on Main Street (Lake-Cook Road) just west of Lageschulte Street from Monday August 24 through Friday August 28th to complete necessary crossing repairs. This closure will impact both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. A signed detour route will be in place during this closure.

Canadian National and Lake County Department of Transportation have both confirmed that this Main Street closure will only take place once south Hart Road at Route 14 has been reopened. This section of Hart Road is planned to reopen by Friday, August 21st and will be part of the detour route during the Main Street closure.  




200 S. Hough Street | Barrington, IL 60010
(847) 304-3400 | barrington-il.gov
We are always interested in your comments; please e-mail us at constantcontact@....
Village of Barrington | 200 S. Hough Street, 200 S. Hough Street,
Barrington, IL 60010
Unsubscribe annaswiet@...
Update Profile | About our service provider
Sent by constantcontact@... powered by
Trusted Email from Constant Contact - Try it FREE today.


Re: FW: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Steve Belknap
 

On Monday, August 10, 2020, 2:03 PM, Mike McGehee (PBM) <fpb-triathlon@...> wrote:

Lena, etc al,

Thank you for your responses.

As some of you know this is not his first world record. Just his first on a velodrome.

Regards,
Mike

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 11:15 AM, Lena Chon
<lmnchon@...> wrote:
Mike, 
Most  of us would dream of one world record, but three? That’s fantastic! 

Very inspiring,
Lena


On Aug 9, 2020, at 8:05 PM, Rich Marisie via groups.io <rmarisie@...> wrote:

 Congratulations!




On Sunday, August 9, 2020, 6:47 PM, Danny via groups.io <brneyfife@...> wrote:

Congrats...


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:25 PM, TOM NELSON <tom.nelson586@...> wrote:


Wow ...  congratulations!!!


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:06 PM, John Guido via groups.io <jbguido@...> wrote:


That’s great news. Congrats to him and the support crew. 


On Aug 9, 2020, at 5:56 PM, Mike McGehee (PBM) <fpb-triathlon@...> wrote:



All,

 

It’s official.

 

My brother has three 50+ world records for a velodrome.

 

100K, 100 mile, 200K.

 

Regards,

Mike

 

From: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:44 AM
To: Mike McGehee <fpb-triathlon@...>
Subject: Fwd: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

 

 

From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
Date: August 8, 2020 at 2:30:56 PM MDT
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Subject: Re:  McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020



 

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 1:31 AM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Thank you Larry

The title states Road Record instead of Outdoor track.  

 

Would you please make a couple spelling changes?

For crew:   Rich Eber, Chloe Rudny, and Jon DeGrave

 

The first page the link sends me to does not have the track location of Northbrook velodrome.  

 

I’ll try to figure out how to send a Strava exercise!

 

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 7, 2020 4:17 pm
Subject: Re: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Hi Dan,

Please proof this 100km record and let me know if any changes need to be made. If so, I will fix them and make sure they don't get into the 200km and 100 miles editions.

 

Thanks,

Larry

 

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 7:35 PM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Hi Larry,

 

Attached is all the paperwork and some photos.  Below is my summary.  

I believe that all the boxes are checked and complete.

Please let me know if I have missed anything

Thank you for all your assistance.  I'm already thinking about how I can fit another one of these in!

Hope to meet you someday soon.  Please let me know if you need some AZ winter training.

Oh - looks like Marko tore up some times on July 25th!  I'm sure he's gonna want to take it to the outdoor track too

 

Dan

 

 

Rider Summary:

Dan McGehee

July 28, 2020

Attempt at 100K, 100-mile, and 200K

Northbrook Velodrome, Northbrook Illinois Park District.  382-meter oval

Clear skies, 70-75 degrees, wind light and variable 4-7 mph out of the west and southwest

100K - 2:29:13,  100-mile - 4:07:14,  200K - 5:24:50

 

COVID started this. Hung up the Track frame in 2012, but as one race after another was cancelled this spring, I found myself time-trialing more and realized that I had enough endurance to give the outdoor track 100 mile a shot. Dusted off the track bike the second week of April and realized how much I enjoyed the simplicity of fixed gear riding.  Never did an outdoor track attempt, so it seemed novel enough to pursue. Eight years of endurance racing on the Mtb seemed sufficient time to quell my disappointment of not going under 3:45 on the indoor 100-mile and I have found the advancements in aerodynamic positioning intriguing. Wanted to go back to Chicago to see my family and friends, so the Northbrook velodrome was a good fit. The ultimate social distancing event - a solo TT that doesn't attract much attention.  The NB Velo Assoc had canceled its racing for the rest of the year and I worked directly with the NB Park District to secure the track. Next step was officials - and Byron Gremley graciously accepted the challenge of lead official. He was the master of that in my road-100 back in 2007 and it was a blessing to have him at the helm again. Second in command was my eldest brother Mike, who’s help was invaluable leading up to event, as he lives close to the velodrome and could provide a spare bike. Howard Kambara, a former Oregon Track athlete,rounded out the officials.  So sad that so many athletic events have been canceled due to COVID and the event industry has taken a hug hit. No one knows this better than Tom Cooney, of Lakeshore Athletic Services (Morton Grove), and he was incredibly instrumental in setting up timing support for me - with Catherine, Howard, Chloe, Lily, Jon, and Peter an absolute pleasure to meet and work with. 
I feel so fortunate to have so many connections in the Chicago area and willing to join the crew. My sister Bridgette, best man Rich, doctoral mentor Len, nephew Aidan - all crucial to the success of the ride. To top it off, the treat of having my oldest son Tyler in town, on break from Med school, to lead the crew. Even my mom made the trip up to the track - how sweet.

 

Cervelo T3 with a Falcon rear disc and a HED tri-spoke front. 175 cranks with 56x17. Garmin power pedals. Ideal cadence would have been 98, and I thought my training supported this - but I was wrong - and the mild wind significantly fluctuating my cadence just drove that point home the further into the event I rode. The pipe-dream was a sub-3:50 100-mile, but under 4 hrs seemed reasonable, and I would stay on the bike as a warm down to the 200K mark. By the 30 mile mark it was obvious that a 98 ave cadence wasn’t gonna stick for more than 2.5 hrs and it was fluctuating 4-5 rpm through each lap due to the wind. As any endurance track rider knows, it’s either keep the power steady and vary the cadence OR vise versa - either way you wear down faster than being able to keep both stable. I’m still not convinced that shifting on a road bike would be faster, but I like the forced full circle of a fixed gear. By 50 miles I decided to push to the 100K with a good pace, then ease back for a bit to make sure I did not blow up after the century and not be able to finish the 200K. It felt really good to get off the bike after the 100-mile and I sat longer than I had wanted before getting on the geared bike for a 5-6 mile spin. Then switched back to to the T3, after switching the wheels out to a Zipp rear disc with a spoked front wheel. Perhaps should have changed the front wheel sooner, as it was much easier to hold the line without the sail effect of the HED front aero wheel. Lesson learned - outdoor is a lot different than indoors.  Also, as good as it felt to get off the bike after the 100 mile, I lost at least 13 minutes in the 2 exchanges.  In hindsight, I would have immediately jumped on the geared bike to keep the legs moving and not waste so much time.

Perhaps I’ll spend some more time on the fixed gear and go for some more old-guy marks. Most likely this will depend on whether COVID continues to cause race cancellations and if my loved-ones and I can stay healthy through all of this. My heart goes out to all that are being affected by this pandemic and I hope that we can all find our way through it.

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


Re: FW: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Mike McGehee (PBM)
 

Lena, etc al,

Thank you for your responses.

As some of you know this is not his first world record. Just his first on a velodrome.

Regards,

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 11:15 AM, Lena Chon
<lmnchon@...> wrote:
Mike, 
Most  of us would dream of one world record, but three? That’s fantastic! 

Very inspiring,
Lena


On Aug 9, 2020, at 8:05 PM, Rich Marisie via groups.io <rmarisie@...> wrote:

 Congratulations!




On Sunday, August 9, 2020, 6:47 PM, Danny via groups.io <brneyfife@...> wrote:

Congrats...


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:25 PM, TOM NELSON <tom.nelson586@...> wrote:


Wow ...  congratulations!!!


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:06 PM, John Guido via groups.io <jbguido@...> wrote:


That’s great news. Congrats to him and the support crew. 


On Aug 9, 2020, at 5:56 PM, Mike McGehee (PBM) <fpb-triathlon@...> wrote:



All,

 

It’s official.

 

My brother has three 50+ world records for a velodrome.

 

100K, 100 mile, 200K.

 

Regards,

Mike

 

From: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:44 AM
To: Mike McGehee <fpb-triathlon@...>
Subject: Fwd: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

 

 

From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
Date: August 8, 2020 at 2:30:56 PM MDT
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Subject: Re:  McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020



 

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 1:31 AM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Thank you Larry

The title states Road Record instead of Outdoor track.  

 

Would you please make a couple spelling changes?

For crew:   Rich Eber, Chloe Rudny, and Jon DeGrave

 

The first page the link sends me to does not have the track location of Northbrook velodrome.  

 

I’ll try to figure out how to send a Strava exercise!

 

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 7, 2020 4:17 pm
Subject: Re: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Hi Dan,

Please proof this 100km record and let me know if any changes need to be made. If so, I will fix them and make sure they don't get into the 200km and 100 miles editions.

 

Thanks,

Larry

 

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 7:35 PM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Hi Larry,

 

Attached is all the paperwork and some photos.  Below is my summary.  

I believe that all the boxes are checked and complete.

Please let me know if I have missed anything

Thank you for all your assistance.  I'm already thinking about how I can fit another one of these in!

Hope to meet you someday soon.  Please let me know if you need some AZ winter training.

Oh - looks like Marko tore up some times on July 25th!  I'm sure he's gonna want to take it to the outdoor track too

 

Dan

 

 

Rider Summary:

Dan McGehee

July 28, 2020

Attempt at 100K, 100-mile, and 200K

Northbrook Velodrome, Northbrook Illinois Park District.  382-meter oval

Clear skies, 70-75 degrees, wind light and variable 4-7 mph out of the west and southwest

100K - 2:29:13,  100-mile - 4:07:14,  200K - 5:24:50

 

COVID started this. Hung up the Track frame in 2012, but as one race after another was cancelled this spring, I found myself time-trialing more and realized that I had enough endurance to give the outdoor track 100 mile a shot. Dusted off the track bike the second week of April and realized how much I enjoyed the simplicity of fixed gear riding.  Never did an outdoor track attempt, so it seemed novel enough to pursue. Eight years of endurance racing on the Mtb seemed sufficient time to quell my disappointment of not going under 3:45 on the indoor 100-mile and I have found the advancements in aerodynamic positioning intriguing. Wanted to go back to Chicago to see my family and friends, so the Northbrook velodrome was a good fit. The ultimate social distancing event - a solo TT that doesn't attract much attention.  The NB Velo Assoc had canceled its racing for the rest of the year and I worked directly with the NB Park District to secure the track. Next step was officials - and Byron Gremley graciously accepted the challenge of lead official. He was the master of that in my road-100 back in 2007 and it was a blessing to have him at the helm again. Second in command was my eldest brother Mike, who’s help was invaluable leading up to event, as he lives close to the velodrome and could provide a spare bike. Howard Kambara, a former Oregon Track athlete,rounded out the officials.  So sad that so many athletic events have been canceled due to COVID and the event industry has taken a hug hit. No one knows this better than Tom Cooney, of Lakeshore Athletic Services (Morton Grove), and he was incredibly instrumental in setting up timing support for me - with Catherine, Howard, Chloe, Lily, Jon, and Peter an absolute pleasure to meet and work with. 
I feel so fortunate to have so many connections in the Chicago area and willing to join the crew. My sister Bridgette, best man Rich, doctoral mentor Len, nephew Aidan - all crucial to the success of the ride. To top it off, the treat of having my oldest son Tyler in town, on break from Med school, to lead the crew. Even my mom made the trip up to the track - how sweet.

 

Cervelo T3 with a Falcon rear disc and a HED tri-spoke front. 175 cranks with 56x17. Garmin power pedals. Ideal cadence would have been 98, and I thought my training supported this - but I was wrong - and the mild wind significantly fluctuating my cadence just drove that point home the further into the event I rode. The pipe-dream was a sub-3:50 100-mile, but under 4 hrs seemed reasonable, and I would stay on the bike as a warm down to the 200K mark. By the 30 mile mark it was obvious that a 98 ave cadence wasn’t gonna stick for more than 2.5 hrs and it was fluctuating 4-5 rpm through each lap due to the wind. As any endurance track rider knows, it’s either keep the power steady and vary the cadence OR vise versa - either way you wear down faster than being able to keep both stable. I’m still not convinced that shifting on a road bike would be faster, but I like the forced full circle of a fixed gear. By 50 miles I decided to push to the 100K with a good pace, then ease back for a bit to make sure I did not blow up after the century and not be able to finish the 200K. It felt really good to get off the bike after the 100-mile and I sat longer than I had wanted before getting on the geared bike for a 5-6 mile spin. Then switched back to to the T3, after switching the wheels out to a Zipp rear disc with a spoked front wheel. Perhaps should have changed the front wheel sooner, as it was much easier to hold the line without the sail effect of the HED front aero wheel. Lesson learned - outdoor is a lot different than indoors.  Also, as good as it felt to get off the bike after the 100 mile, I lost at least 13 minutes in the 2 exchanges.  In hindsight, I would have immediately jumped on the geared bike to keep the legs moving and not waste so much time.

Perhaps I’ll spend some more time on the fixed gear and go for some more old-guy marks. Most likely this will depend on whether COVID continues to cause race cancellations and if my loved-ones and I can stay healthy through all of this. My heart goes out to all that are being affected by this pandemic and I hope that we can all find our way through it.

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


Re: FW: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Lena Chon
 

Mike, 
Most  of us would dream of one world record, but three? That’s fantastic! 

Very inspiring,
Lena


On Aug 9, 2020, at 8:05 PM, Rich Marisie via groups.io <rmarisie@...> wrote:

 Congratulations!




On Sunday, August 9, 2020, 6:47 PM, Danny via groups.io <brneyfife@...> wrote:

Congrats...


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:25 PM, TOM NELSON <tom.nelson586@...> wrote:


Wow ...  congratulations!!!


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:06 PM, John Guido via groups.io <jbguido@...> wrote:


That’s great news. Congrats to him and the support crew. 


On Aug 9, 2020, at 5:56 PM, Mike McGehee (PBM) <fpb-triathlon@...> wrote:



All,

 

It’s official.

 

My brother has three 50+ world records for a velodrome.

 

100K, 100 mile, 200K.

 

Regards,

Mike

 

From: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:44 AM
To: Mike McGehee <fpb-triathlon@...>
Subject: Fwd: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

 

 

From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
Date: August 8, 2020 at 2:30:56 PM MDT
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Subject: Re:  McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020



 

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 1:31 AM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Thank you Larry

The title states Road Record instead of Outdoor track.  

 

Would you please make a couple spelling changes?

For crew:   Rich Eber, Chloe Rudny, and Jon DeGrave

 

The first page the link sends me to does not have the track location of Northbrook velodrome.  

 

I’ll try to figure out how to send a Strava exercise!

 

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 7, 2020 4:17 pm
Subject: Re: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Hi Dan,

Please proof this 100km record and let me know if any changes need to be made. If so, I will fix them and make sure they don't get into the 200km and 100 miles editions.

 

Thanks,

Larry

 

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 7:35 PM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Hi Larry,

 

Attached is all the paperwork and some photos.  Below is my summary.  

I believe that all the boxes are checked and complete.

Please let me know if I have missed anything

Thank you for all your assistance.  I'm already thinking about how I can fit another one of these in!

Hope to meet you someday soon.  Please let me know if you need some AZ winter training.

Oh - looks like Marko tore up some times on July 25th!  I'm sure he's gonna want to take it to the outdoor track too

 

Dan

 

 

Rider Summary:

Dan McGehee

July 28, 2020

Attempt at 100K, 100-mile, and 200K

Northbrook Velodrome, Northbrook Illinois Park District.  382-meter oval

Clear skies, 70-75 degrees, wind light and variable 4-7 mph out of the west and southwest

100K - 2:29:13,  100-mile - 4:07:14,  200K - 5:24:50

 

COVID started this. Hung up the Track frame in 2012, but as one race after another was cancelled this spring, I found myself time-trialing more and realized that I had enough endurance to give the outdoor track 100 mile a shot. Dusted off the track bike the second week of April and realized how much I enjoyed the simplicity of fixed gear riding.  Never did an outdoor track attempt, so it seemed novel enough to pursue. Eight years of endurance racing on the Mtb seemed sufficient time to quell my disappointment of not going under 3:45 on the indoor 100-mile and I have found the advancements in aerodynamic positioning intriguing. Wanted to go back to Chicago to see my family and friends, so the Northbrook velodrome was a good fit. The ultimate social distancing event - a solo TT that doesn't attract much attention.  The NB Velo Assoc had canceled its racing for the rest of the year and I worked directly with the NB Park District to secure the track. Next step was officials - and Byron Gremley graciously accepted the challenge of lead official. He was the master of that in my road-100 back in 2007 and it was a blessing to have him at the helm again. Second in command was my eldest brother Mike, who’s help was invaluable leading up to event, as he lives close to the velodrome and could provide a spare bike. Howard Kambara, a former Oregon Track athlete,rounded out the officials.  So sad that so many athletic events have been canceled due to COVID and the event industry has taken a hug hit. No one knows this better than Tom Cooney, of Lakeshore Athletic Services (Morton Grove), and he was incredibly instrumental in setting up timing support for me - with Catherine, Howard, Chloe, Lily, Jon, and Peter an absolute pleasure to meet and work with. 
I feel so fortunate to have so many connections in the Chicago area and willing to join the crew. My sister Bridgette, best man Rich, doctoral mentor Len, nephew Aidan - all crucial to the success of the ride. To top it off, the treat of having my oldest son Tyler in town, on break from Med school, to lead the crew. Even my mom made the trip up to the track - how sweet.

 

Cervelo T3 with a Falcon rear disc and a HED tri-spoke front. 175 cranks with 56x17. Garmin power pedals. Ideal cadence would have been 98, and I thought my training supported this - but I was wrong - and the mild wind significantly fluctuating my cadence just drove that point home the further into the event I rode. The pipe-dream was a sub-3:50 100-mile, but under 4 hrs seemed reasonable, and I would stay on the bike as a warm down to the 200K mark. By the 30 mile mark it was obvious that a 98 ave cadence wasn’t gonna stick for more than 2.5 hrs and it was fluctuating 4-5 rpm through each lap due to the wind. As any endurance track rider knows, it’s either keep the power steady and vary the cadence OR vise versa - either way you wear down faster than being able to keep both stable. I’m still not convinced that shifting on a road bike would be faster, but I like the forced full circle of a fixed gear. By 50 miles I decided to push to the 100K with a good pace, then ease back for a bit to make sure I did not blow up after the century and not be able to finish the 200K. It felt really good to get off the bike after the 100-mile and I sat longer than I had wanted before getting on the geared bike for a 5-6 mile spin. Then switched back to to the T3, after switching the wheels out to a Zipp rear disc with a spoked front wheel. Perhaps should have changed the front wheel sooner, as it was much easier to hold the line without the sail effect of the HED front aero wheel. Lesson learned - outdoor is a lot different than indoors.  Also, as good as it felt to get off the bike after the 100 mile, I lost at least 13 minutes in the 2 exchanges.  In hindsight, I would have immediately jumped on the geared bike to keep the legs moving and not waste so much time.

Perhaps I’ll spend some more time on the fixed gear and go for some more old-guy marks. Most likely this will depend on whether COVID continues to cause race cancellations and if my loved-ones and I can stay healthy through all of this. My heart goes out to all that are being affected by this pandemic and I hope that we can all find our way through it.

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


 

--

Larry Oslund

 


Re: FW: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Mark Poynor
 

Awesome 👏 


Mark’s
IPhone 11 Pro

On Aug 9, 2020, at 18:25, TOM NELSON <tom.nelson586@...> wrote:

Wow ...  congratulations!!!


On Aug 9, 2020, at 6:06 PM, John Guido via groups.io <jbguido@...> wrote:

That’s great news. Congrats to him and the support crew. 


On Aug 9, 2020, at 5:56 PM, Mike McGehee (PBM) <fpb-triathlon@...> wrote:



All,

 

It’s official.

 

My brother has three 50+ world records for a velodrome.

 

100K, 100 mile, 200K.

 

Regards,

Mike

 

From: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:44 AM
To: Mike McGehee <fpb-triathlon@...>
Subject: Fwd: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

 

 

From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
Date: August 8, 2020 at 2:30:56 PM MDT
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Subject: Re:  McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020



 

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 1:31 AM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Thank you Larry

The title states Road Record instead of Outdoor track.  

 

Would you please make a couple spelling changes?

For crew:   Rich Eber, Chloe Rudny, and Jon DeGrave

 

The first page the link sends me to does not have the track location of Northbrook velodrome.  

 

I’ll try to figure out how to send a Strava exercise!

 

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Larry Oslund <larryoslund@...>
To: Dan <dtmcgehee@...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 7, 2020 4:17 pm
Subject: Re: McGehee 100-mile 07-28-2020

Hi Dan,

Please proof this 100km record and let me know if any changes need to be made. If so, I will fix them and make sure they don't get into the 200km and 100 miles editions.

 

Thanks,

Larry

 

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 7:35 PM <dtmcgehee@...> wrote:

Hi Larry,

 

Attached is all the paperwork and some photos.  Below is my summary.  

I believe that all the boxes are checked and complete.

Please let me know if I have missed anything

Thank you for all your assistance.  I'm already thinking about how I can fit another one of these in!

Hope to meet you someday soon.  Please let me know if you need some AZ winter training.

Oh - looks like Marko tore up some times on July 25th!  I'm sure he's gonna want to take it to the outdoor track too

 

Dan

 

 

Rider Summary:

Dan McGehee

July 28, 2020

Attempt at 100K, 100-mile, and 200K

Northbrook Velodrome, Northbrook Illinois Park District.  382-meter oval

Clear skies, 70-75 degrees, wind light and variable 4-7 mph out of the west and southwest

100K - 2:29:13,  100-mile - 4:07:14,  200K - 5:24:50

 

COVID started this. Hung up the Track frame in 2012, but as one race after another was cancelled this spring, I found myself time-trialing more and realized that I had enough endurance to give the outdoor track 100 mile a shot. Dusted off the track bike the second week of April and realized how much I enjoyed the simplicity of fixed gear riding.  Never did an outdoor track attempt, so it seemed novel enough to pursue. Eight years of endurance racing on the Mtb seemed sufficient time to quell my disappointment of not going under 3:45 on the indoor 100-mile and I have found the advancements in aerodynamic positioning intriguing. Wanted to go back to Chicago to see my family and friends, so the Northbrook velodrome was a good fit. The ultimate social distancing event - a solo TT that doesn't attract much attention.  The NB Velo Assoc had canceled its racing for the rest of the year and I worked directly with the NB Park District to secure the track. Next step was officials - and Byron Gremley graciously accepted the challenge of lead official. He was the master of that in my road-100 back in 2007 and it was a blessing to have him at the helm again. Second in command was my eldest brother Mike, who’s help was invaluable leading up to event, as he lives close to the velodrome and could provide a spare bike. Howard Kambara, a former Oregon Track athlete,rounded out the officials.  So sad that so many athletic events have been canceled due to COVID and the event industry has taken a hug hit. No one knows this better than Tom Cooney, of Lakeshore Athletic Services (Morton Grove), and he was incredibly instrumental in setting up timing support for me - with Catherine, Howard, Chloe, Lily, Jon, and Peter an absolute pleasure to meet and work with. 
I feel so fortunate to have so many connections in the Chicago area and willing to join the crew. My sister Bridgette, best man Rich, doctoral mentor Len, nephew Aidan - all crucial to the success of the ride. To top it off, the treat of having my oldest son Tyler in town, on break from Med school, to lead the crew. Even my mom made the trip up to the track - how sweet.

 

Cervelo T3 with a Falcon rear disc and a HED tri-spoke front. 175 cranks with 56x17. Garmin power pedals. Ideal cadence would have been 98, and I thought my training supported this - but I was wrong - and the mild wind significantly fluctuating my cadence just drove that point home the further into the event I rode. The pipe-dream was a sub-3:50 100-mile, but under 4 hrs seemed reasonable, and I would stay on the bike as a warm down to the 200K mark. By the 30 mile mark it was obvious that a 98 ave cadence wasn’t gonna stick for more than 2.5 hrs and it was fluctuating 4-5 rpm through each lap due to the wind. As any endurance track rider knows, it’s either keep the power steady and vary the cadence OR vise versa - either way you wear down faster than being able to keep both stable. I’m still not convinced that shifting on a road bike would be faster, but I like the forced full circle of a fixed gear. By 50 miles I decided to push to the 100K with a good pace, then ease back for a bit to make sure I did not blow up after the century and not be able to finish the 200K. It felt really good to get off the bike after the 100-mile and I sat longer than I had wanted before getting on the geared bike for a 5-6 mile spin. Then switched back to to the T3, after switching the wheels out to a Zipp rear disc with a spoked front wheel. Perhaps should have changed the front wheel sooner, as it was much easier to hold the line without the sail effect of the HED front aero wheel. Lesson learned - outdoor is a lot different than indoors.  Also, as good as it felt to get off the bike after the 100 mile, I lost at least 13 minutes in the 2 exchanges.  In hindsight, I would have immediately jumped on the geared bike to keep the legs moving and not waste so much time.

Perhaps I’ll spend some more time on the fixed gear and go for some more old-guy marks. Most likely this will depend on whether COVID continues to cause race cancellations and if my loved-ones and I can stay healthy through all of this. My heart goes out to all that are being affected by this pandemic and I hope that we can all find our way through it.

 


 

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Larry Oslund

 


 

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Larry Oslund